Go to navigation
It is currently Sat Dec 03, 2016 12:22 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Extra time in KS2 SATS
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 5:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Hi

Does anyone know if the criteria for extra time in KS2 SATS are published anywhere?

Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 5:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4019
Location: Reading
I can't tell you if or where they are published, but I remember from the info meeting at DDs primary that the school need to be able to justify why the child is getting extra time and it should be that they normally get extra time for other tests routinely. I think this means they shouldn't be getting treated differently for SATs Than they normally do.

A primary teacher on here should be able to tell you better though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 5:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11931
https://ncatools.education.gov.uk/Acces ... /Home.aspx

I think it's here on the right hand side


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Thanks Tinkers and Guest 55.
Here are the questions:

Quote:
LogoStandards and Testing Agency
Additional time application form questions

These questions are taken from the form which schools must use to apply for pupils to have additional time for the key stage 2 national curriculum tests. The form must be completed on the NCA tools website at https://ncatools.education.gov.uk/Home.aspx.

Question 1
This question is designed to identify pupils who are able to understand an instruction given in their first language, but who do not use English as an additional language.
Can the pupil respond appropriately to a simple request or instruction given in English without prompts or aids?
Note: in the context of this question ‘aids’ relate to interpreters or translators which enable the pupil to understand English as an additional language.

Question 2
This question is designed to identify pupils with a hearing impairment.
Can the pupil respond appropriately to a simple verbal request or instruction given in English without prompts, aids or having to lip read?
Note: in the context of this question ‘aids’ refer to communicators and sign language interpreters which compensate for the pupil’s hearing impairment.

Question 3
This question is designed to identify pupils with a visual impairment.
Can the pupil read and understand text without the need for braille and/or enhanced text?

Question 4
This question is designed to identify pupils with specific difficulties in concentrating, possibly reflecting ADHD, learning disability, autistic spectrum disorders, and/or behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.
Can the pupil focus on a task for at least 15 minutes with no difficulty and without prompts?
Note: ‘Task’ refers to any type of normal classroom work which requires the pupil to work independently and without interruption.

Question 5
This question is designed to identify pupils who write with great difficulty in their first language. This may be because of a temporary or permanent physical, motor skill or learning disability that means the pupil has difficulty managing the conflicting demands of processing information, thinking what to write, how to spell it, and writing it legibly.
Does the pupil have a free-writing speed of more than 10 words per minute?

Question 6
This question is designed to identify pupils who have difficulty reading.
Can the pupil read the text of practice English reading tests aloud and fluently with no/very few errors (ie less than 5 errors per 20 words)?
Note: in the context of this question, the level of the practice tests should be aimed at year 6 pupils.

Question 7
This question is designed to identify pupils who have specific processing difficulties when decoding information.
In general, can the pupil correctly understand what questions from a practice key stage 2 test are asking them to do:
immediately after reading the questions or having had them read to them; and
without referring back to the questions?
Note: in the context of this question:
the practice tests can be English or mathematics
the level of the practice tests should be aimed at year 6 pupils

Question 8a
This question is designed to identify pupils who have difficulty remembering information.
Can the pupil repeat back a string of 5, random single-digit numbers with no difficulty?

Question 8b
This question is designed to identify pupils who have difficulties processing information.
Can the pupil correctly understand what questions from a practice key stage 2 test are asking them to do when allowed to refer back to them?
Note: in the context of this question:
the practice tests can be English or mathematics
the level of the practice tests should be aimed at year 6 pupils


In other words, this is a screening questionnaire. It is neither a set of absolute criteria, as used by the exam boards at GCSE and A levels; nor does it take into account the discrepancy of scores typical of bright dyslexics, as used by universities (typically high IQ combined with relatively low processing speed).

Quote:
Reports from educational psychologists or other education professionals are not required and won’t be considered.


DD has been assessed by a Specialist Teacher and would have extra time at KS4, A Levels and university. However, at KS2 she doesn't qualify for extra time on the basis of the answers to these questions. I'm not sure what happens next: school says they can still discuss it "with someone in government". Does anyone know?

Problem is, this questionnaire isn't as subtle or sophisticated as an assessment by a Specialist Teacher or Ed Psych, and I wonder how many bright dyslexic children are denied extra time in terms of these rules? It surely isn't right that the same child can be assessed in three different ways at different moments in their academic careers.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 9:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11931
This was a new system last year and caused issues ... call the LA as they should have someone in charge of assessment to help you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 9:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Thanks G55. I didn't know it was a new system and will try the LA.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 9:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11931
You shouldn't need to - the school should do this.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6962
Location: East Kent
Guest55 wrote:
You shouldn't need to - the school should do this.


Yes, they will.

Speak to the school, we are quite nice , really!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Posts: 3810
Location: Chelmsford and pleased
The advice that I have used is 'standard' classroom practice. Does a child normally have extra time/scribe/reader, etc.
However, I haven't needed the rules this year and haven't sought current advice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2015 6:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Thanks for the replies.

Quote:
You shouldn't need to - the school should do this.


I think school is planning to speak to someone - not in the LA but in government.

Quote:
'standard' classroom practice. Does a child normally have extra time


School trialled extra time and DD used it and it changed her level.

Quote:
Speak to the school, we are quite nice , really!


I know and I have, but I am anxious as it has taken a few years for the nature of DD's strengths and weaknesses to be understood, with persistence and seeking second opinions on my part. Without the independent evidence we later obtained, extra time was not awarded for the 11+. Now we are preparing for appeal and the significance of the SAT results for DD both at appeal and in the event of having to try the 12+ preoccupy me.

In fairness, I think that children of my sort are very difficult to identify and support: they are known as "twice exceptional", see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twice_exceptional (more authoritative links available if anyone is interested.)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016