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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 8:24 pm 
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Hi all

I have noticed that there are a few premature children discussions on this forum but I just wanted to ask if anyone has had a successful appeal by arguing that their child was born extremely premature.

My twins were born 14 weeks early and have just sat the 11 plus. If they don't get an offer, could I appeal on the basis of their prematurity?

Should their prematurity be mentioned to the schools involved before we get the results or only after 1 March?

Look forward to some replies.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:15 pm 
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Sonia nn wrote:
Should their prematurity be mentioned to the schools involved before we get the results
No - I'm afraid it will serve no purpose.

Quote:
I just wanted to ask if anyone has had a successful appeal by arguing that their child was born extremely premature.
If they were successful, I think it would almost certainly have more to do with the strength of their alternative academic evidence.
As we often say on here, "You might win an appeal with strong academic evidence but no extenuating circumstances. You cannot win an appeal with extenuating circumstances but insufficient academic evidence".

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 2:34 pm 
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Thanks for your response.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:03 pm 
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What I would want to say is that if my twins were born when they were supposed to be born then they may have a few extra marks due to age standardisation.

PLease let me know if anyone has any experience of this.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 9:19 pm 
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Sonia nn wrote:
What I would want to say is that if my twins were born when they were supposed to be born then they may have a few extra marks due to age standardisation.

Sonia - have you seen the other thread?
viewtopic.php?f=35&t=48401&p=590699&sid=2ad27e7f3a1ade7fb4734a126cf6cea3#p590699

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 11:32 am 
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OP - I remember looking into this last year or in the run up to exams and I did read somewhere (but can't remember where) that severe prematurity was worth mentioning. I think it may have been an "add on" point - so if you have the academic evidence to warrant an appeal it is another (but minor) issue that you can raise. My twins were more than 12 weeks premature (born in April but should have been the end of July).

Hope you get the results you want without needing an appeal. I think the 11+ journey is hard for lots of parents, having twins go through it where you worry how it will affect your family if one passes and the other doesn't takes the stress levels to a whole new level. Good luck.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 1:26 pm 
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Just out of general interest if the prematurity led to the DC being into a different academic year would that be considered. What would happen if, say, they were born 12 weeks early in August and should have been born in the following academic year (November)?

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:02 pm 
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I'd have thought (and I stand to be corrected) that in a case such as that - where the children were due in say October but were born in August - that the children are taking the exams effectively a whole school year ahead of their "due date" peers. I'd have thought that if there is good academic evidence, and they weren't miles off the exam pass mark, that it must be a compelling argument for appeal panels.

Certainly now, you can apply for the children to stay back a year, and go through school in that cohort (although how that carries through into secondary school is still up for debate) but certainly 11 years ago, whilst you could apply for the children to start school late, when they did start, they would have joined Year 1 (effectively missing reception) so they'd still be taking the exam a year early.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:20 pm 
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Mandy21 wrote:
Certainly now, you can apply for the children to stay back a year, and go through school in that cohort (although how that carries through into secondary school is still up for debate) but certainly 11 years ago, whilst you could apply for the children to start school late, when they did start, they would have joined Year 1 (effectively missing reception) so they'd still be taking the exam a year early.


Not being in the correct year for your birthdate causes huge amounts of difficulties at the 11+ stage (and often later on too)so it is advised against strongly these days.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:30 pm 
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Reading Mum wrote:
Not being in the correct year for your birthdate causes huge amounts of difficulties at the 11+ stage (and often later on too)so it is advised against strongly these days.
Sorry to disagree, but the opposite is the case. It has just been made a lot easier to allow children to start school later and far from being 'advised against strongly' it is gaining more and more currency. When I did it with my own daughter it was indeed a struggle, but we managed it. Even then (she is 20 now) we had assurances that she could sit the 11 plus if we wished her to with the cohort with whom she was educated. In the event it didn't happen as we home educated her for a long time and then she joined her birth cohort; and she didn't sit the 11+. I would not allow thoughts of 11+ to discourage anyone who is considering a later start to school - there are many advantages which even Nick Gibb has recognised. .
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/summ ... hool-later


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