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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 1:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:38 am
Posts: 2
I have been through 3 appeals and have been successful.
I also checked the information on this web site - it is extremely good and well balanced. Before you think about an appeal, please read it through.

My children both passed the 11+ so my experience was in supporting others directly in the process without having the huge emotional baggage which goes with it. If you want to appeal, involve an objective thinker. The stakes are very high for the parents so be prepared for an emotional experience.

The key thing to remember is that the people on the panel have no connection with the LEA. In fact on two occasions one person on the panel had no knowledge of the 11+ process (!). The panel members are only there to rationalise what is fair, based on the fact that there are probably NO places available. Places cannot be created where none exist. Remember also, that students drop out of school (parents relocate etc.) so it may be easier to win an appeal at Easter or summer during year 7.

Most people understand that each appeal is for a particular school because the thresholds are different.

Do remember that the 11+ is a process to determine whether your child is bright enough to succeed in an academic grammar school environment. On one occasion, our strategy was to demonstrate excellence in a High School and seek an appeal for a place in year 8. The student was so committed and outperformed everyone in the year that the appeal was successful.

Also remember that High Schools offer GCSEs and A levels and vocational training and children can be happy there also, particularly if all their school friends are going there.

If you decide to appeal - you will need to develop arguments which go beyond the mere details of the 11+ exam because the panel will be considering other criteria. Good Luck!


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 1827
Location: Gloucestershire
Hi, Philster,

Some very good advice you give there.

Philster37 wrote:
If you want to appeal, involve an objective thinker. The stakes are very high for the parents so be prepared for an emotional experience.


There are times when people appeal because of emotions, when they have no actual excuse for doing not so well in the exam. A friend might recommend that you reconsider - otherwise you may end up even more upset. Sometimes we get mum and dad together, one is together & logical, the other all emotional - and it's not necessarily mum in tears. That said, we don't penalise for being upset, nor are we swayed by a bucket full of tears.

Quote:
The key thing to remember is that the people on the panel have no connection with the LEA.
This is true in most circumstances, and certainly should be true. Very occasionally it's not true, in which case you may have recourse to the Ombudsman.

Quote:
Do remember that the 11+ is a process to determine whether your child is bright enough to succeed in an academic grammar school environment. On one occasion, our strategy was to demonstrate excellence in a High School and seek an appeal for a place in year 8. The student was so committed and outperformed everyone in the year that the appeal was successful.

Also remember that High Schools offer GCSEs and A levels and vocational training and children can be happy there also, particularly if all their school friends are going there.


Beware terminology! In Gloucestershire, a High School is a girls grammar school. In other parts of the country, they may be secondary schools. But anyway, I agree that children who are bright but have not made it through the selection process can and do go on to do well in the comps. And that's not the only reason a bright child may end up in a comp - many parents are opposed to selection at 11, so do not enter their children for the test.

Quote:
If you decide to appeal - you will need to develop arguments which go beyond the mere details of the 11+ exam because the panel will be considering other criteria.


If there was an argument that the child failed the exam because the child sitting behind him kept poking him with a pencil, that may well get through an appeal, but we do like to know more details of the child and their interests, as well as as many possible reasons for not passing the test. Lots of medium sized reasons might be as good as granny dying the night before.

Nice to have yet another angle on it. 

_________________
Capers


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 8:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 6:55 am
Posts: 25
capers123,

I'm on Essex forum, my ds shockingly under performed, compared to how he had been scoring in practice papers. He has told me that there was a man sitting next to him, who kept getting up and down, talking to and pointing at the2 boys sitting in frontpapers. the boy in front kept slapping his feet on the floor. he said that he found this very distracting, is this grounds for an appeal?

Or just a huge complaint to the school which held the exam. I think that it's outrageous to be distracted in that way. Surely those needing asistance should have a special room.

your advice please.


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