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 Post subject: overjoyed with the boy
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:39 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:33 pm
Posts: 3
Hi all

My boy got 119 and 117 I'm overjoyed (never seen the like in my family!!)

My problem is if we appeal I may blow it for him by not being able to put over a case for him :(

So 1. is the scores good enough to have a go.

2. can you get someome a bit cleverer than a humble driver to go and talk for him.

thanks ever so for any replies

Greg


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:52 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 12:49 pm
Posts: 53
go for it, you've said it all in the post you can say it in front of a panel. You want the best for your boy and that's what counts - 39 years ago my dad, who was a humble insurance clerk fought an appeal for a school for me. He won and of course so did I, I'll never forget it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 5:26 pm
Posts: 7059
I agree. Those are respectable scores.

Appeal panels are there to deal with "ordinary" folk! - and are more likely to be sympathetic than if you are represented by someone else.

See the Q&As, A11:
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/11plus ... nswers.php

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Etienne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 4:27 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 1827
Location: Gloucestershire
Etienne wrote:
Appeal panels are there to deal with "ordinary" folk! - and are more likely to be sympathetic than if you are represented by someone else.


I agree. We don't look at your presentation of the appeal or eloquence, your accent, stumbling speech or whatever. We just want to hear the facts & truth, and can often see through the gloss of slick presentations!

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Capers


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 4:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:33 pm
Posts: 3
thanks for your replies

great site by the way :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:33 pm
Posts: 3
hello again

I have been looking at other info that may help an appeal, can someone say what outside school things are any good. i mean he has piano lessons and is a scout should i write this in my letter?

Thanks kindly

Greg


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 11:12 am 
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 1827
Location: Gloucestershire
Lincoln wrote:
I have been looking at other info that may help an appeal, can someone say what outside school things are any good. i mean he has piano lessons and is a scout should i write this in my letter?


Yes, but don't make a big thing about it. Mention what grade he has taken in piano, but don't send in the certificate & examiners notes. Likewise, certificates from Scouts for district scout football events will be glanced at & ignored by the panel - all we need to know is that he does have a life outside school.

That said, if your son had taken grade 5 or above, I'd pay slightly more attention to it, as occasionally high musical ability can be linked to high IQ. Mind you - grade 5 at 10 would be pretty remarkable!

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Capers


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 11:37 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 374
Location: Bucks
Lincoln,

My husband and I are both vaguely eloquent or rather we are used to speaking from time to time in public but when it came to Appeal Day, in front of the panel, neither of us felt very composed and that fact we were talking about our 'little soldier' and his future made the whole issue so much more emotional.

Don't worry, it is not the panel that make you feel that way, they are regular people who speak normally, dress very normally, appear to act normally, it's the fact you are trying to get it right for your child that makes the occassion so hard.

Our downfall was 'lack of academic evidence'. Our Head was rubbish, hated the grammar school system and didn't care so we walked in with a sheet of paper saying what a lovely 'little soldier' we had whereas what the panel wanted was some of the following, or similar.....

Here is evidence of his last VR score showing he is capable of reaching Bucks grammar school requirement (121 or above);
Here is evidence of his CAT score earlier this year;
Attached is a copy of his English essay which was displayed at a recent school event;
Here is his latest maths test where he came 1/2/3 out of a high achieving class/year;
He is gifted/talented in reading
He attained Level 5 in English and Maths at the end of Year 5 and a note from his teacher saying he is maintaining this level.
Here is a note from a French teacher saying how well he is learning in her lesson...

These all form part of the letter you send in beforehand to the Appeals Panel. All of the above can be attachments to your main letter, then on the day of the Appeal, just read the letter again to the panel, refer to the particular achievement and wait for the panel to flick the pages until they find the evidence supplied previously.

Yes, they have read it before but remind them of the great achievements to date, make them listen so they understand the point you are explaining, remember they listen to hundreds of Appeals in a short period of time. Unless his reason for not making the mark is unusual, dwell very little on that negative aspect, carry on waving his flag!

Once you have reached the end of the letter, if you feel you want to add something slightly less academic have a few notes to remind you to tell them how he is a well rounded, nice kid. Scouts, piano, swimming, football, chess, whatever. And if you feel brave, look at the panel at this point, look down quickly if the brave pill wears off. :lol:

Once you have done your bit and the panel/LEA ask you questions they will ask you to sum up - so bring out another sheet where in 30 seconds you read out very briefly his best/outstanding 5 academic attributes so as when you leave the room they have firmly placed in their mind some wonderful images of your bright, well rounded, enthusiastic son with fab parents to help him along the way.

So, in essence, the hardest part of the Appeal is you getting together your paperwork, your Head (and your own 'head') may be busy with Xmas coming up but go back again and again until you have a heap of great evidence about your son and then sort through it and decide what do you think makes him different from the child in the Appeal before yours.....

Come back to the Forum and ask more questions, loads of people on this site have passed Appeals and will have some great ideas and advice - good luck - it could be a busy and frustrating few weeks but hey, it could be a great outcome if you get it right.

Ambridge x


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 1:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8199
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi Greg

As Capers rightly says there isn't a lot of value in most out-of-school activities at an Appeal.

If the child has achieved highly within their interests (such as piano grades, or the Chief Scout's Silver Award at Cubs), then it is "worth a mention" towards the end of your chat to the panel.

If you don't include it, the panel may ask you what he does outside school, and that is usually a "filler" question whilst they take on board the details of the case.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 3:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:16 pm
Posts: 149
Hi Greg

I am a humble housewife !!!!! hubby a carpenter and last year we went to appeal for our DD who had gained 119 on both papers. Neither of us are used to speaking in front of people so were very very nervous. I think ambridge's advice is really good. I read my letter to the panel, they asked us some questions. We were honest, said we were not sure why she had not gained 121. At the end we were asked to sum up and I again read from a prepared sheet, just giving the main points and adding some out of school activities and responsibilities she had been given at school.

The panel were nice, not scary at all really. The main thing is to get as much academic evidence as possible.

Go for it if you feel a grammar school is right for your child.


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