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 Post subject: Appeal hearing today
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 6:34 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 9:59 pm
Posts: 15
Just thought I would post the details of our hearing we had today. I have found this website so helpful in the preparation, I wanted to be able to help others in the same position.

The panel members were very pleasant and had a very good sense of humour (I dont know if they are all like that or if we were lucky!)

The questions we were asked were:

How did he feel on the morning of the tests?
How did he feel after the tests?
How did he feel after he found out his result?
Did he do practice papers at home?
Does he read?
What does he like to do in his spare time?
What does he want to be when he is older?
Would he be able to cope in a fast paced GS?
He does alot of other activities, would he be able to prioritise?
What language does he speak to his sister in? (as we speak a 2nd language at home)
Does he tend to rush his work and therefore make careless mistakes?

They asked my daughter who came with us:
Does he understand what is required of him in a GS as he has seen you go through it?
What sort of books does he read compared to the type of books you used to read?
Can you think of how something in your language would have a completely different meaning in English?

I think that was everything, if either Etienne or Sally-Anne have any views on the questions we were asked or their interpretations of them I would be very interested in hearing them.

Just be honest in your answers, read through everything you have already sent them to remind yourself and try and relax.

Good luck !!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:18 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8204
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi pre2407

Thank you for posting those - I am sure that Etienne will add them to her Q&As on the next revision. I have my fingers crossed for you! :D

Standard questions:
How did he feel on the morning of the tests?
How did he feel after the tests?
How did he feel after he found out his result?
Does he tend to rush his work and therefore make careless mistakes?

All are looking for reasons why the result might not have been as expected. There are no right or wrong answers, but it is always good to refer back to the academic evidence wherever possible when answering these questions.

Filler questions (mainly):
Does he read?
What does he like to do in his spare time?
What does he want to be when he is older?
Would he be able to cope in a fast paced GS?

There are traps here - if he prefers the Beano to Artemis Fowl, for example. Hardly any child knows what they want to do when they are older by the age of 10/11, and I always think this is a rather pointless filler question! As for "does he read?" - I think I would be hard pushed not to say: "If he couldn't, I think he might have had a bit more trouble with the 11+ :wink:" (Sorry - getting facetious now!)

Quite case specific:
He does alot of other activities, would he be able to prioritise?
What language does he speak to his sister in? (as we speak a 2nd language at home)

The first one shows a possible risk in putting forward too many extra-curricular interests at an appeal!

Slightly surprising!
Did he do practice papers at home?

I wonder if this is a gradual move away from the tradition that Bucks panels do not not ask about tutoring? As Bucks have now softened their line on whether tutoring makes a difference, perhaps panels feel that they have a little more freedom in this area?

If other people have the time to post the questions they were asked it would be very helpful.

Now a question for you pre2407. May I ask - if you won't think I am being nosey - why you took your daughter along, and how the panel responded to her presence? If you prefer not to mention it on the Forum that is fine, but I would most interested in talking to you about it via PM.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:33 pm 
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I think it inappropriate to ask questions of your daughter.

Three years ago, at our appeal I was asked in depth about my other children, where they went to school, and how similar/dissimilar they were to the child for whom I was appealing - again, I felt these questions should not have been asked.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:44 pm 
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi asd guest

I think this is the first time that I have known a parent take a sibling to a Bucks appeal, other than as a translator (where perhaps obviously. the parent has not posted on here beforehand!). That is why I am curious to talk to pre2407 about their experience today.

Was your appeal 3 years ago in Bucks? If so, I am surprised that you were questioned in such depth about the siblings.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:59 pm 
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As mentioned previously we speak a different language at home. My husband does not feel very comfortable speaking in English and therefore wasnt confident with presenting (although he did still attend). I took my daughter to help me with the presentation as her spoken English is very fluent. Also, just a quick note, my daughter is 22 and therefore alot older so it didn't feel 'odd' for the panel to ask her a question.

However, I do feel that if the sibling is of a similar age to the child, it is inappropriate to ask about their academic abilities.

Fingers crossed.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:03 pm 
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Sorry I missed your 2nd question..

The panel responded well to her and didn't mind her being there, they didn't ask why she was there or anything like that. Although, I don't think they were expecting her to present but when I explained that I had brought her along to help me with the presentation they were fine with it and didn't question it.

I'll be happy to answer any more questions :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:04 pm 
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Thanks pre2407 - that clarifies things for me. I was assuming that your daughter was still of GS age.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:07 pm 
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I did sometimes come across older siblings (6th form age or in their 20s) who attended to help present the case.

I agree that whether or not it is appropriate to ask a sibling questions depends on how old they are and whether it is clear they are there in a supporting role.

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Etienne


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:22 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 9:59 pm
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Etienne, you said you have come across older siblings attend an appeal. Was this ever a disadvantage?

I think my questions are becoming a bit podantic or you could call it paranoia :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:34 pm 
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Quote:
Was this ever a disadvantage?

No, it wasn't - and it was usually in your sort of situation (the sibling didn't need to interpret, but their English was more fluent.)

Many thanks for all the feedback!

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Etienne


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