Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:19 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 11:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 7:53 pm
Posts: 92
Has anyone in the Solihull area got a daughter sitting the Warwickshire 11+ next Saturday (3 October)? If they get a place at Stratford Girls or Alcester Grammar what are your travel arrangements?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 10:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 7:59 am
Posts: 893
Location: Cloud 9
Hi orianagirl,

Good luck to your daughter on Saturday.

I don't think you'll get much response on this issue until the results are out in March...

Charlotte
x


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 11:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 459
Location: Rugby
Hi orianagirl,

Charlott67 is right but I am sure you and your dd have everyones' very best wishes for Saturday!

I have just read the quoted text given below and urge you to take the positive message from it which is not to be too put off either way by how easy or difficult the test appears on the day. My dd took last years test (and passed) and said it was fairly difficult and did not answer all the questions - in common with many others who also passed! This Saturday, her birthday, she will be celebrating but also remembering those who are having a stressful day. Good Luck!


Something to bear in mind when doing your 11+ exam...

"The final exam results are ‘standardised’ which means your score may actually go up or down depending on how well you do in comparison to everyone else taking the test this year in your area. There are only a set number of places in grammar schools so if everyone does really well on the test paper all of the scores will be adjusted down slightly, so that only the required percentage of students passes the test. The same happens if the test is really hard and everyone gets a very low score, the scores will be adjusted upwards slightly to ensure that the required percentage still passes.

Therefore, all you need to do is realise that if the test paper seems really easy, please make sure you work as accurately as possible to ensure you get the highest mark you can without making any careless errors as it is likely the scores will be adjusted downwards if the test is easy. Likewise, if the test paper seems really tricky, stay calm, as it is very likely that everyone is finding it tricky so keep working through the paper as best you can to score as well as you can since the scores are likely to be adjusted upwards."


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 5:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 7:53 pm
Posts: 92
Thanks for the replie, btw SassiesDad which school did your daughter end up at and does she enjoy it?

It is also my daughter's birthday on Saturday and she is a bit put out at having to sit the exam but I hope it will be worth it in the end.

Hope you daughter has a great birthday.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: standardised marks
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 3:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:47 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Warwickshire
The final exam results are ‘standardised’ which means your score may actually go up or down depending on how well you do in comparison to everyone else taking the test this year in your area.
However scores are also standardised I believe according to the child's birth date. the older ones are discriminated against as the younger ones get a couple of extra marks.

Warwickshire won;t say exactly what effect this has but you can search on the internet about how it is done.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: standardised marks
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2008 7:40 pm
Posts: 90
Location: CV 47
lynnd1 wrote:
However scores are also standardised I believe according to the child's birth date. the older ones are discriminated against as the younger ones get a couple of extra marks.


This is incorrect and as a "Tutor" I would expect you to know better.

Standardised scores are derived so that the ages of the children are taken into account by comparing a child only with others born in the same month.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:35 pm
Posts: 60
Very interesting, what you are the only child taking that exam born in a particular month, very unlikely I know, but what happens then?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:55 pm
Posts: 160
I don't understand how it works. Can anyone explain slowly and clearly.......


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 5:12 pm
Posts: 1300
Location: Birmingham
Dadof3's explanation is broadly correct.

The age standardisation mechanism is actually based on a mathematical non linear regression transformation based on a paper by I P Schagen Applied Psychological Measurement Vol 14 No. 4 December 1990 pp 387-393


http://apm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/14/4/387

I'm afraid that downloads of the paper are now chargeable. (didn't used to be!)

Essentially this is a curve fitting exercise where all raw scores are fitted to a normal distribution with various checks to confirm that the data doesn't violate consistency rules.

For the method to valid there must be a mimimum size in the candidate population


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:26 am
Posts: 1326
Location: Watford, Herts
KenR wrote:
The age standardisation mechanism is actually based on a mathematical non linear regression transformation based on a paper by I P Schagen Applied Psychological Measurement Vol 14 No. 4 December 1990 pp 387-393

http://apm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/14/4/387

I'm afraid that downloads of the paper are now chargeable. (didn't used to be!)

Essentially this is a curve fitting exercise where all raw scores are fitted to a normal distribution with various checks to confirm that the data doesn't violate consistency rules.

I don't think we're missing much. That paper is pretty opaque. It also describes four variants of the method, and I don't think we know which of those is actually used.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016