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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2008 4:22 pm
Posts: 526
Location: Tonbridge & Tunbridge Wells
Hi
Two interesting articles about the role of after school activities, especially sport, which appear to help boys (in particular) do better in exams and school work.

The research suggested that taking part in voluntary activities helped children build higher self-esteem, reduce levels of depression, get greater public recognition throughout the school, make more friends, and reduce drop-out rates.

Would be interested to hear from parents in terms of:

a) which activities they believe work best?
b) the number of after school actvities their DC do, and are too many activites counter-productive ie lead to tiredness and burn-out?

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_a ... 418634.ece

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 95477.html

Best
Villagedad


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:37 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 6:09 pm
Posts: 379
Location: groombridge, e.sussex
My DC have always done many activities thoroughout their primary years; mainly sports for DS long with Scouts until local group finished. He now does tennis and cricket in village. I feel that he does not get enough sport at school and am more than happy for him to add-on outside school. Generally I would think he tires his body doing this while tiring his mind at school (and Homework!) and certainly never think he is TOO tired from sport.
DD still does dance, Craft club, ICT, guides and tennis although this could all change in Sept when she changes school. Not as active as DS so i don't think she does too much, just taking opportunities to try things out. Dance has bben great as she never wanted to be seen on stage and has now done a show without any problems. Great for confidence and feeling good with body (she is 11!)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:34 am
Posts: 271
Location: S East
Villagedad wrote:
Hi
Two interesting articles about the role of after school activities, especially sport, which appear to help boys (in particular) do better in exams and school work.

The research suggested that taking part in voluntary activities helped children build higher self-esteem, reduce levels of depression, get greater public recognition throughout the school, make more friends, and reduce drop-out rates.

Would be interested to hear from parents in terms of:

a) which activities they believe work best?
b) the number of after school actvities their DC do, and are too many activites counter-productive ie lead to tiredness and burn-out?

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_a ... 418634.ece

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/educa ... 95477.html

Best
Villagedad


At DSs' prep school, every one of the swim team from DS1's year comes from the scholarship set. Same pattern seems to be visible in other years. I thought it was some weird coincidence, and mentioned it to a State comp teacher friend, and she says she has observed something similar. Could still be coincidence, or could be mixing cause and effect (academic kids drawn to swimming), but something to consider.
Also benefits from being cheap sport, not prone to injuries, very good aerobic exercise for fitness, and can be individual or team (relay).

_________________
Exams are formidable for the best prepared. The greatest fool may ask what the wisest man cannot answer.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:00 pm
Posts: 558
Location: Wales
There have been times this year (year 6) when I have thought that DS was doing too much sport. He would often say that he felt "totally battered" (rugby). At one point this was his schedule:

Mon: School rugby after school (1.5 hours)
Tue: County rugby in evening (2 hours) + swimming in school time
Wed: Club hockey after school (1 hour)
Thur: Club rugby in evening (1.5 hours)
Fri: School games afternoon (2 hours)
Sat: County rugby match (1.5 hours) only some weeks though
Sun: Club rugby match or training (2 hours)

We gave up club hockey in the end but only as he was selected for East Wales rugby and training was the same day.

He refused point blank to give any of this up - what do you do?

Anyway he was offered sports and academic scholarships so fits with claims in the article. I think we need to be careful though - I do worry about burn out!

I thought he could have a good rest over the summer but he plays cricket (for club U11s and U13s so with training and also school cricket that's 4 times a week!). School hockey is still ongoing with the school having qualified for a major national cup competition. He also does 1 hour a week Pro-Performance training which he loves.

So much for the rest then. Trials for Heart of Wales rugby start next month!


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:16 am 
I wouldn't worry Freya. This passion is clearly coming from him so if he does need to rest he will. Boys can be driven but they are generally not perfectionists so I don't think he would over train to get better and I don't think a child can over train, he does the correct amount because he loves it. :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:32 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 6:09 pm
Posts: 379
Location: groombridge, e.sussex
As mentioned already my DS also had a very busy sporting schedule while at Primary and we warned him that Grammar school homework would have to come first. This proved to be such a good incentive to get homework done on the day it was given with no messing sbout! Even on a Friday he gets on with it as soon as he gets home so that he has the whole weekend free to play as much sport as possible.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 12:18 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:00 pm
Posts: 558
Location: Wales
SP - you make a good point about homework. My DS is the same! My DD, having not a sporting bone in her body and with plenty of time to spare would often put homework off to the last minute and do a rush job! :roll:

Tipsy - thanks for the reassurances! :D


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 5:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 2361
Just a word of caution re youngsters & sport. Please do be careful re their physical development. Absolutely agree that plenty of sport is great but could quote various examples where teenagers have suffered physical problems as a result of doing too muchof a particular activity - too much strain on particular parts of the body as they are growing.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 7:31 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2007 8:55 pm
Posts: 851
Location: Bexley
KB - I'm glad you mentioned that. My 12 year old rugby/cricket mad son has developed Osgood Schlater's disease (not sure of spelling). It came on suddenly after the last match of the rugby season and he is now limping his way pitifully though the cricket season. He apologised to me the other day for being snappy but he said he feels really frustrated because he's not playing cricket as well as he knows he can and isn't able to take part in weekly rugby fitness sessions.

Osgood Schlater's is a complaint which is apparently very common in boys aged 12-14 who play a lot of sport. I believe it's a result of over-exercising the thigh muscles which puts a strain on the tendon connecting the kneecap to the shinbone (but those with more medical experience will correct me if this is the wrong interpretation). This results in a painful lump just below the knee. Rest is the only treatment - but try telling that to my son. He missed 2-3 weeks of the cricket season resting on his physio's instructions but now goes to games with his knee strapped up and a can of freeze spray in his bag. Watching him limp between the wickets is very sad :(


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 12:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:00 pm
Posts: 558
Location: Wales
Bexley Mum 2 - how horrible for your DS to be suffering. He must be miserable! I can imagine how sad you feel watching him cope as best he can with this and how difficult it is for you to impose rest on a sports mad boy! Bless him for apologising to you for being snappy! I hope he grows out of this before too long and then you can post how happy he is!

Just a thought - he doesn't play wicket keeper does he? That particular position puts a big strain on thighs and knees due to the number of times in a match you have to squat and rise! If he does then could you ask for him to be played in a different fielding position for a while? My DS played Wicket keeper last season and we were amazed at the muscle development in his thighs. This season we encouraged him to try for a bowling spot instead as we were aware of Osgood Schlater's in young lads and he had just had a very demanding (and long) season of rugby!.


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