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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2006 12:42 pm 
Quoting the Sunday Times today:

"Parents who want to maximise the chances of their children getting a university education at Oxford or Cambridge used to choose a top private school, fork out and hold their breath. But those lucky enough to have a child at Colyton in Devon, Kendrick in Reading or Queen Elizabeth’s in Barnet, north London, will wake up today to the news that all three have been rated above many of Britain’s most expensive private schools. "

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0, ... 52,00.html

I think this is very misleading: Eton gets 46% of its leavers into Oxbridge whereas the rest barely manage 10%.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2006 1:45 pm 
Hi Sunday Bore,

The tables make interesting reading:

http://www.times-archive.co.uk/onlinesp ... chools.pdf


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2006 11:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8203
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi "Bored on Sunday"

I'm rather glad you're bored enough to post that link - very interesting reading indeed! It puts into perspective our local grammar and private schools in Bucks.

Best wishes
Sally-Anne


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:42 am 
Interesting, but inaccurate. It omits my daughter's school King Edwards Handsworth , Birmingham, which fulfils the criteria. If it misses one, what other inaccuracies does it contain.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 9:36 am 
Completely agree with Sunday Bore. Top private schools (St Paul's, Westminster, Eton etc) get half their intake into Oxbridge year after year. The top grammars get about 10%.

This suggests a massive bias towards these schools. But it may also be a reflection of the fact that there's more to a good education than Gcse and A level results that require a narrow tick-box style of teaching. As I understand it, the top private schools teach well beyond the national curriculum and cover subjects in greater depth. League tables of this sort are very misleading and only encourage schools to stick to the very basics.
Sunday Bore wrote:
Quoting the Sunday Times today:

"Parents who want to maximise the chances of their children getting a university education at Oxford or Cambridge used to choose a top private school, fork out and hold their breath. But those lucky enough to have a child at Colyton in Devon, Kendrick in Reading or Queen Elizabeth’s in Barnet, north London, will wake up today to the news that all three have been rated above many of Britain’s most expensive private schools. "

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0, ... 52,00.html

I think this is very misleading: Eton gets 46% of its leavers into Oxbridge whereas the rest barely manage 10%.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:22 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:29 pm
Posts: 1805
Location: Berkshire
Interesting to note that according to thier table, 10 out of the top 12 are girls schools!!


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 3:43 pm 
Maybe because girls do tick-box better than boys?


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 5:16 pm 
Yes my daughter goes to one of those schools and she often comes home with homework that is a page of boxes to tick. I don't know - the state of education these days. Take me back to my school days, they knew how to teach then didn't they and the girls knew their place.


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