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 Post subject: DS, Wiis, PSPs etc!
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:09 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 1:03 pm
Posts: 1413
Hi, our DS's (only Yr1) friends all have at least one of the above. We've been very resistant so far because we think/ thought it would reduce playing/ reading/ engagement with the world - especially his parents :D but I've read a couple of people on here mention that their DC's have them and even that they helped with speed-thinking etc and so wondered what people's opinions on them were? I know you can get Junior Brain Train on them but have no idea if that's a scam to alleviate parental guilt when they are also getting some M cart game as well?!

Any views as to their potential harm/ positive aspects would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:16 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:02 am
Posts: 106
We didn't get Nintendo DS until our DS was in Year 3(there was no preasure from him anyway). He loves reading ,we don't have TV.
Some games require a child to read instructions (quite a lot of it :shock: , so good for reading).Also games like Professor Layton http://professorlaytonds.com/ are fantastic to do.
I am strict with age limit put on games and DS is good for younger children, better choice of 3+ and 7+ games.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:17 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8115
I never had much fun with the DS but love the Wii. I'm not sure what my kids felt - probably much the same!!

Seriously though - the novelty soon wore off for the wii I think. We all play ++ at each xmas but it faeds through january....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 11:05 am
Posts: 349
I agree that there is a better selection of games for younger children with a DS or a Wii.

A DS is easier to carry around and it does help with long journeys 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2008 4:25 pm
Posts: 2610
We only have the Wii as it can be played as a family.

Personally I wish we didn't have that. I have found that they do interfere with the children's ability to amuse themselves in other ways. I recently brought in a ruling that the Wii is only available on weekends and computers on Tuesday and Thursday. The children have thankfully gone back to playing with their playmobil etc and are much happier all round. These things do seem to bring out an aggression in them that I don't like.

I am not saying this is the case for everyone but in the past children from families where they were all freely available would come to my house and not know how to play. They would either go home complaining they were bored or would run around wildly and destructively with poor concentration spans unable to engage in quality imaginative play with all the other toys that we have available.

Having said that it may have been that they were like this anyway and the reason why their parents resorted to the multi media in the first place. For one particular friend we do sometimes allow a break of the Wii only on weekend rule :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:04 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
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Our children saved and bought their own DSs when they were around 10, apart from little person who got his at 8. They are occasionally useful on car journeys, period. They rarely come out at home. We made a rule that they would not come out on sunny days or when we had guests. As it turned out, we didn't ever have to enforce the rule as no-one wanted them out anyway.

We do not have x-box, wii, playstation or similar. No-one cares and though we did sort of half heartedly offer a wii for Christmas, no-one wanted it. Relief all round really as we didn't want it either - too intrusive and we are not big on TV here either. All 3 do have iPods and for us that is the best bet: they come with headphones so we don't have to hear anything!

It depends on your child - ours all like to be outdoors, though the boys enjoy computers, but not for games, which they don't have or show an interest in - more for programming type activities and making power points, doing things on garage band (Mac), filming pretend broadcasts etc. I certainly do not think anyone here feels 'left out' because they don't have these gadgets.

I agree with Tolstoy's point about children being unable to amuse themselves and we have found this too - we have a big wooded garden and access to a stream, and loads of places in the village to make dens and generally play. We have had several children here who have decided it is 'boring' and asked for the above-mentioned gizmos...often these are the same children who will only eat chicken nuggets or a particular brand of sausage. You only ask them over once!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
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Ours had hand-helds (many, many years ago!) when they were small for car journeys - with educational games on - and found them really useful. Were only allowed when travelling so a treat which kept them amused.

Were useful when flying on holiday because there was a limit on the books/toys you could take & they were good for chilling in the afternoon/ keeping them amused in the early morning while away.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 9:26 am
Posts: 284
Hi

DS (11) has an Xbox - he likes to come home and do a bit of racing before homework. I think he sees it as a bit of a wind down from school. But doesn't play on it every day and when he does it's usually only for 1/2 an hour or so.

DD (8) has a DS. She's quite faddish and will play with it a lot one week and then not touch it for a month. She likes doing the brain training (particularly the Suduko) but best game is the dogs one!

I also have a DS (40) :oops: - best present OH every bought me (almost)! I like doing Suduko or puzzles (I know, very sad).

We also have a Wii (and Wii Fit) which the kids use occasionally, usually with friends or family (great at Xmas, watching Granny trying to holahoop after a couple of Baileys :lol: :lol: :lol: ) However, I probably use the Wii the most for exercise. Currently on my 2nd 30 day programme with the Wii trainer - highly recommend it, my thighs are really feeling the burn!

OH fancies himself as a bit of a techno buff (we have to watch the Gadget Show every week) hence all the gear. Could we live without it? Of course but I would miss my DS, Nintendo that is :lol: :lol: :lol:

Plumx


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:28 pm
Posts: 2439
We've had Wii for a couple of years and got Nintendo DS at Christmas. I prefer the Wii as its more interactive and you can see what is being played. Its also more sociable. With the DS, they tend to curl up and play, and you can't really see what they are doing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:40 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:23 pm
Posts: 120
I am going to put my hand up here and be very un-PC given the earlier posts.

My children have the lot, x-boxes, ds's psps, ipods, you name it they have it! Having said that I don't think it has harmed them in any way. Both children passed their 11 plus well with no formal tutoring. They both enjoy watching tv, reading, playing outside, going out with friends. In fact I credit the early use of the computer in them being able to read as they learnt to read game instructions from an early age.

I don't think it is right or wrong to have electronic equipment. Many of the posts make me feel like an inadequate parent but we have brought our children up to be independent and confident (sometimes too much so). They know that what they are playing is make believe. It is also important for kids to 'fit in' as they grow up and I think a little of everything is okay.

Even if I am alone in admitting to allowing all of the above I am not sorry that we do. It is important to have a well rounded upbringing and banning something early on may only make it addictive later in life :D


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