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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:12 pm 
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Does anyone know the answer?


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:25 pm 
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mmm well - probably because 4 is that the national "Target" and it would be embarrassing if lots of kids got a 6... would make getting a 4 rather less impressive.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:48 pm 
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Depends on the teacher/school. They may only be marked at level 5.
DS's teacher got a group of the more able pupils to sit a KS3 Maths paper, so that she could see their true level and so that they could see what they will be doing in Maths in the next couple of years. Most of them did really well, some expectationaly well.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:53 pm 
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Sure I understand it could be embarrassing but are more able kids actually being assessed properly??? If a child gets 100% in their sats papers then they are surely above a level 5??


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:01 pm 
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Why does it matter?

The levels used in KS3 and 4 do not correspond directly to those used in the primary curriculum anyway, so when parents worry about children 'stagnating' because they were level 5 at primary school and are still level 5 at the end of Year 7, it is like comparing apples and pears. The SATs are a very good way of assessing how good children are at passing SATs. The level for the end of KS2 was supposed to be 4. So everyone wants 5. Make the level 5 and everyone will want 6. There is only so far you can go - do you want them all to get GCSEs while they are still at primary school? The people with the greatest interest in SATs results are usually the parents of those scoring highly - I suspect there must be a vicarious glory to be had. The fact that universities are still complaining about the quality of their first year undergraduates must mean that at least some of these high level 5s in primary schools are inflated and not especially good indicators of future brilliance.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:17 pm 
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Well yes I think it does matter. All children should be assessed that their actual level and not capped at a certain point. Neither of my kids are particularly high achievers but if you’re not going to assess all kids to their real levels there is little point bothering at all, or why not just stop a level 4 if that’s the expected level.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:20 pm 
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Years ago there were level 6 papers. Quite a number of children did achieve level 6 maths, they would have needed extra work as new topics are introduced at level 6 that would not normally be taught at primary. It is perfectly possible to get 100% at KS2 and not be anywhere near level 6 as there are only a few level 5 questions in a ks2 maths SAT. As Amber said children appear to stall in year 7 because they will be tested on a much wider range of level 5 maths.
If I remember correctly, the number achieving level 6 in English was virtually nil at 11, because a child needs to be bringing a level of maturity, normally associated with a 14/15 year old, to their reading and writing. Even really gifted children usually lack the maturity and necessary life experience.

I think the teacher can assess them at a higher level now and if single level testing is rolled out, level 6 test results may reappear at KS2.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:23 pm 
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I don't think it does matter as many schools do not do SATS anyway and I think that most people are aware that they are not the best way to assess children.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:36 pm 
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trumpet wrote:
Well yes I think it does matter. All children should be assessed that their actual level and not capped at a certain point. Neither of my kids are particularly high achievers but if you’re not going to assess all kids to their real levels there is little point bothering at all, or why not just stop a level 4 if that’s the expected level.



Where would you then draw the line? The same can be said of GCSEs and A levels. So much so that they have now introduced A*s, but what happens in a couple of years time when more children will be getting A*s, will they then bring in A** and then where does it all stop.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:39 pm 
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I agree, it doesn't matter at all; SATS are just trying to identify is whether a child is below, at or above the standard required. The nonsense of whether someone is 5a or 6 or whatever is purely a result of someone using numbers, which have some kind of magical significance all their own, rather than simply saying "above" or "below" to avoid pejorative associations. Quite apart from the arbitrariness of one child apparently achieving at a different level by scoring one point more than another, but that's a whole other can of worms!

Mike


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