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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 12:49 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:14 am
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If you're still reading after that long winded title I'm trying to decide what to do re DS's music lessons. He plays the piano a little, but he and we thought that in order to take part in school music activities, bands etc it would be useful to start a new instrument. We therefore signed up for cornet lessons through the school music service. We thought that the lessons would be rotated so that he would miss little bits of a variety of lessons, but it appears that he will just miss one part or another of a double maths lesson!
Having signed up for the lessons we also discovered that he could have these for free through a local brass band who have provided both the instrument and the relevant books and which take place at the weekend. He loves these and is making good progress.
The obvious thing would be to stop school lessons at the end of term, however I'm a little concerned as to how to go about this ie what to say to the school and also whether he will still be encouraged to take part in house music events, school bands etc if he's being taught outside of school. Obviously the person in charge of music lessons there will know that he is continuing with them elsewhere. Is it reasonable to ask her to encourage him to be part of school musical events?
does anyone else's DC have lessons outside of school, but contribute to school music?
Thanks for reading!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:20 pm
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When dd was in primary we signed up to the school music service keyboard lessons, naively thinking they would be in addition to her lessons (perhaps at lunch-time/break) but like you, found they were taken during normal lesson time. I was not amused, I can tell you, especially as, after two years she'd hardly advanced (and neither had any others!). We also found she was horrid to the children (I thought it was just my dd who'd taken a dislike to her, it turned out she liked to shout at all of them - it was a group lesson too!).

She was a peripatetic teacher, with luck your ds's will be too :D

Anyhow, we had to give notice to County Hall, but can't remember if it was a half-term or full term's notice though.

If I were you I'd just explain (if you HAVE to face the teacher) that you weren't aware it would be during normal lesson time and you're not happy with that. There's no reason why the teacher will stop your ds from taking part in all other music activities, it makes no difference to the teacher I expect.

Do check your paper-work, I'm sure it will tell you all about it.

By the way, we then got dd a proper piano teacher who's fantastic (I know 'cos I've started learning too) and dd is flying now! - whereas I just break out in laughter at my efforts all the time :shock: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 1:05 pm 
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Thanks Snowdrops. I believe it's a term's notice which is OK, if necessary although I am concerned about the intrusion in lessons. I'm not aiming to speak to the actual brass tutor, who is indeed peripetetic, just the lady who organises all of the music lessons.
Sounds like you made a good choice re the new teacher. My DS's piano teacher.. don't get me started :evil:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 3:40 pm 
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Shouldn't make a difference that the child is having lessons outside school - I think that there are quite a few occasions when this happens - sometimes lessons are started in primary and then carried on out of school when the child moves on to senior school. DS's school have a thriving big band - am sure that many of them do not have lessons through the school arrnaged teachers - some are taught through LA music centre - others have private lessons. Music Centre is currently trying to handle the surfeit of alto saxophonists by encouraging a few to try the tenor - if they succeed this is likely to benefit the school band who are decidely short or Tenor Sax places and won't mind at all where they have come from!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 4:03 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 10:31 am
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You can stop the lessons now if you choose: you've committed to pay for them this term, but if you and your son think it's preferable to stop attending them now that's up to you. Explain why and give notice now so that you don't have to pay for next term. Your reasons are very understandable (free lessons! free instrument! what more is there to say?) and there's no reason why he shouldn't participate in school music. My daughter has lessons outside school and has been pretty well conscripted into the school orchestra (not unwillingly, but she was too shy to audition) because they need more violins.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:09 pm 
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Thanks Herman and Sherbet, that's all I needed to hear. :) I'll contact the school tomorrow and give notice for next term now you've completely reassured me.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:24 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
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Location: Rugby
Just want to add my four pen'ith. Learning any instrument is (almost) pointless and soul destroying for a child if they never get the chance to "make music". My two daughters (eight years apart) each play the violin; both have had a "privileged" education the first received as much tutoring as we could afford. She was able but lazy (not motivated). Beyond age eight she never got to play in front of (or with) anyone. In her teens she was so dozy she left one on a bus; never to be seen again! :>)
Youngest had many fewer lessons although showed similar early facility and technique. However, to the (State) schools great credit they got her to play in the school. To her own credit she made (some) effort to practice. She has never taken an AB grade exam but now (in year eight) she has continued to play violin even though she has not had a lesson for three years. She is at Rugby School. She does not have music lessons because she wanted to continue ballet and I count not pay for both. However she continues to be allowed to play in a string ensemble (I am told they are Grade six standard) along side at least one child who gained their scholarship as a Musician. Music is great for everyone! It needs to be fun and joyful, like all other forms of learning and growing!


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