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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 9:47 am 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11646978

Interesting comment on the the effect on a child's education depending on the number of other siblings. Quality vs quantity.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 11:16 am 
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Location: Chelmsford and pleased
What a shame that interested parents are branded "pushy". To not be interested in many other countries is considered poor parenting.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 1:25 pm 
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Interesting comment about number of siblings, and true, to a certain extent. With four children we simply don't have the time to be as involved (or "pushy") as we would like, and we've noticed that we seem to expect more independence from our children at an earlier stage than is the case for some of their peers from smaller families. We find that our focus moves between whichever child is in greatest need of our help at the time, whether it's applying to a new school, filling out a uni application, preparing for a music exam, etc. We do not expect to have to nag them over routine stuff such as homework.

I also agree that the term "pushy" has negative overtones. Until fairly recently it applied to parents who were excessively involved in their children's progress and advancement (think Violet Beauregarde in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory :lol: ), whereas nowadays it is used to describe parents who take a natural interest in and encourage their children. Unfortunately it has lost none of its negative connotations, with the result that parents who take an active interest in seeking out the best school, etc. are regarded as doing something wrong, simply because they are constantly being compared with those who do not become involved.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 1:44 pm 
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Marylou wrote:
Unfortunately it has lost none of its negative connotations, with the result that parents who take an active interest in seeking out the best school, etc. are regarded as doing something wrong,


Like those on this forum :lol: :lol: :lol:

There is a parent I know and she is very negative about 11+ and the tutoring that goes with it, yet she drags her cherub to dancing, ballet etc 3 days midweek and 2 hours on saturday. If her cherub has raw perfoming talent while should she be dragged to all these places? :roll:

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 1:52 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 5:29 pm
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Location: Chelmsford
Thanks !
As a mum of 5 children just starting to embark on the school choices, 11+ etc... with my eldest, I've read it with interest.
However, because it is based on pupils born in 1958 - much longer before I was even born, completly different education system, social background ect... - I am not quite sure how we can so easily apply or extrapolate the conclusions to our times :wink: .


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:44 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2006 1:21 am
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Interesting article on this subject in the Guardian: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... ren-school
followed by discussion about the (re)definition of the word pushy.

Last paragraph especially pertinent - in our case, especially! (Pushy? Me? Chance would be a fine thing!) :lol:

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