Go to navigation
It is currently Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:08 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 1:52 pm
Posts: 737
Had interim school report for my DS today - teacher says that he must be encouraged (by myself and her) to read modern classics rather than the stuff that he chooses for himself. He's only 6 and a half - I just think it's great he's enjoying reading and I don't want to start pushing him in any particular direction yet. Should I ignore teacher's recommendation (made twice in the space of a dozen line school report), go along with it (how? - what is a modern classic for a 6-7 year old?), or tell teacher that I don't agree? Half term now so I've got over a week to think about it (and would rather think about that than DD's Eleven Plus result. :roll:)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4607
Maybe she means things like Swallows and Amazons or Enid Blyton? I read these at about this age but my kids found them rather dated. Or CS Lewis? My kids are a it older & you quickly lose track of what is age appropriate!

PS I've just reread your post and realized it said MODERN classics. Harry Potter? A bit too young for that I would have thought. I would ask the teacher for some recommendations.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: caversham
push-pull-mum wrote:
Had interim school report for my DS today - teacher says that he must be encouraged (by myself and her) to read modern classics rather than the stuff that he chooses for himself. He's only 6 and a half - I just think it's great he's enjoying reading and I don't want to start pushing him in any particular direction yet. Should I ignore teacher's recommendation (made twice in the space of a dozen line school report), go along with it (how? - what is a modern classic for a 6-7 year old?), or tell teacher that I don't agree? Half term now so I've got over a week to think about it (and would rather think about that than DD's Eleven Plus result. :roll:)


Try a twin track approach carry on with the fun stuff that DS likes and ask the the teacher to supply a modern classic :roll: that you can start to work on it with DS, in my experience that might mean pages or parts of pages, as you are making a jump rather than a graduated change.

That way you can blame soon to be last year's teacher if the modern classic doesn't work out.

Trying to preserve and enhance the enjoyment of reading at an early age is far more important than careering ahead.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:14 pm
Posts: 612
Location: essex
My daughter read the first Harry Potter very happily in the summer term of year two. Her teacher was still giving her the bloomin Biff and Chip books at the time.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 8:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4607
Yes I think my DC read them some time in year 3 and then reread them for years, getting more out of them each time. I'm not really sure how much they understand at that age. DC2 waited until year 5 and romped through them all and I suspect got more out of them by waiting, but they are all different. What do people think is meant by modern children's classics other than (the wonderful) Harry Potter?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 8:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:19 pm
Posts: 6257
My DS2 was reading these in Yr 2 - Secret Seven and then later progressed to Famous Five - children still love them. Then tried Just William, Jeremy James etc. Wouldn't get too worried about word "classic"!

He then became slightly obsessed with the Beast Quest series of books and romped through 30 of these in Yr3 :shock:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 11:04 am
Posts: 455
ds1 was reading H.Potter at around that age. He started with Enid Blytons(The enchanted wood,famous 5,secret 7,)H.P, Roald Dahls. I think he was about 8 when he read Swallows and Amazons. His school gave him Watershipdown when he was 9 and he had it for a whole term as he didn't enjoy it but had to finish it! :shock:
Between those books he read, Pinnochio, Treasure island and loads that I can't remember.
There is a thread/sticky in the English section about good books.

_________________
Everyone is a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will think it is stupid.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:08 pm
Posts: 1226
Roald Dahl?

These have the advantage of varing alot in length and difficulty so you can gradually progress.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 4:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 1:52 pm
Posts: 737
turtleglos wrote:
There is a thread/sticky in the English section about good books.


Thank you! Going to check there now ...

Minesatea wrote:
Roald Dahl?



Good idea - DD was frightened of Dahl but DS might be made of sterner stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:14 am
Posts: 938
Dick King Smith is another you could maybe try.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016