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 Post subject: HOME SCHOOLING
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 7:32 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 269
Location: somewhere in kent
Faced with the option of the school my child has been given - not good

Iam considering home schooling. I have done this in the past for only several months.

Please could I invite comments from parents who have any views either way...................


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 8:13 am 
I am so sorry you have not been given any happy options. Personally I would be very worried about home schooling because of the social implications.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 9:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11931
We considered it for similar reasons to you - in our case no school allocated - we got as far as finding people to support teaching of some subjects we felt we could not tackle at KS3.

There are plenty of websites to help you e.g.

http://www.education-otherwise.org/


Can you move nearer a school you want? I think the internet has made the prospect easier but .....


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:29 pm
Posts: 1805
Location: Berkshire
There was a program recently on gifted children.
The main point I noted was that they were all home schooled for various reasons.

I know someone in the same position, they have taken this route at secondary level. Having been unsuccessful at the 11+ last year. But at the same time they also have their daughter's name on the waiting list for their alternate school of choice. She has two older brothers and a younger sister, and still has piano, trampoline and guides activities around this. so the social side is catered for, in a manner as well.

It's expensive, in so much as you need to buy all the books. If you feel confident in pursuing this path, and are fully aware of all aspects concerning this decision, It can provide an alternative solution.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

BW


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 4:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:01 pm
Posts: 250
Location: Richmond
The usual riposte from home educators to the 'socialisation' issue is that thier child has lots of friends from various 'activities'. That's fine as far as it goes, but how much opportunity do they have to choose friends not of their parents choosing (so to speak?) Strikes me that there is an element of control freakery with home-schooling with parents unwiling to trust their children to make their own choices re friendships. Also, activities tend to be structured - where is the just playing, (or hanging out, I suppose with older children!) and decidign what to do themselves with thier friends, as they do at playtime/breaks/lunchtimes? Also, where is the influence from other adults who will have different and diverse views from the parents?I see part of my role as a parent is to encourage them to interact with teachers who may not think the same as me - I don't claim to have all the answers or the definitive view everything! Harder to acheive iof our child only ever meets parents' friends, or their ballet teacher in a ballet lesson context!

_________________
Best Regards,
Thea


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:53 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8199
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi Cindy

I think you are very brave to be considering this, but you have been forced into a corner. I greatly admire parents who Home School - it is a responsibility that I certainly wouldn't relish!

I think that Thea does have a point on the social side. I would feel it was very important that the child already had a very secure group of friends that would survive the break with school. I would want them to be involved in something like Scouts or Guides, where there are lots of opportunities to meet a broad range of children, and the chance to do camps and holidays. I would also want them to have a couple of regular sporting activities, less for the social benefit, but for the physical exercise and possible team participation.

The subject I would think is toughest to home school, especially for an older child, is science because of the need for equipment. Just guessing though.

Just some thoughts - very good luck in making your decision Cindy.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject: home schooling
PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 1:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 269
Location: somewhere in kent
Thank you to all those who replied, it is much appreciated.

I shall consider fully the implications before home schooling.

For info:

The Science Museum do practical science sessions just for home schooled children. I supplied my e mail address to the dedicated home school department. They would mail me with dates for these sessions, which follow the key stage 1 and 2. They have a room set up a bit like a theatre,
and the children are involved in the presentation.
It was fantastic, and if I my memory serves me right, I did not pay anything for this.....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 6:20 pm 
These practical sessions are also availabe to the general public. We quite often go on a Sunday and the children love it. You're right these practical activities are amazing and well worth the visit.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8199
Location: Buckinghamshire
Great tip Cindy & Guest!

We have been to the Science museum many times, but not heard of these sessions before. The website is down at the moment, but if I can't find more info on there I'll be back to you on this!

Thank you.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject: home schooling
PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 8:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:27 pm
Posts: 238
Location: london sw
Cindy

How brave you are. I used to work with a lady who home educated her three children together(they were primary level). The great thing was that she could go along to museums during term time and tag along with other schools and their museum guides. She also said that she could get through a weeks schooling in less than three days!!!!!!! :shock:

Jenny


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