Go to navigation
It is currently Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:09 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 4:25 pm
Posts: 51
I need help on this and am a contributor as DD has just done her 11+ exams so seeking support and advice for DS who is only 7 and a term into Year 2 at infant school, hence he only has 2 terms left. However, the school he is in is going downhill fast, receiving a "poor" Ofsted last term, a succession of children leaving for better local schools and I have just had an offer of a place for him at an outstanding school, nearer to where we moved to last year, which also feeds into the junior school I want him to go to, but where few of his existing peers will go to due to the small catchment area. There are at least 3 very disruptive children in his class of 22, which has waivered betwen 20-25 with on average 3 leaving and 3 arriving each school year. I put his name down in frustration and upset following the Ofsted and various political problems at the existing school early in November - what do others think, should I think twice before moving him or rule it out completely? Should I just grab the place? He is bright and being pushed as more able in numeracy and literacy now the school is trying to get its act together, and one of the older and more physically confident in his peer group and has lots/makes friends easily. I don't want him to hate me and I suppose if he categorically refused what would I do? I know he'd miss his 2 best friends but could ensure he would still see them as they will go to a different school anyway in Year 3. Any advice? I will be visiting the new school in next few days hopefully to look around and discuss in more detail.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 10:21 pm
Posts: 13
I was in a similar situation when my DS was in Year 1. His school had failed their ofsted inspection at the beginning of November and I changed schools by the end of November.
It was the best decision I made, he was a very quiet ,shy child but settled well by December and hasn't looked back. Children adapt very well to new situations, it's just us mums who worry too much. If the school is better and closer, I wouldn't (and didn't ) hesitate.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 9:46 pm
Posts: 188
Personally I would grab the place while it is available - especially as it feeds the junior school you want.
Children make friends so easily at this age and he would have new friends to move up to juniors with.
He wouldn't hate you and he can't refuse, he's seven- you're the mother - it's all about the way you sell it to him!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:40 pm
Posts: 298
I think it is best not to make your mind up until you have actually seen the place and have a feel for it. Would it be possible to arrange a visit with your child so can both have a look around?

My DD is going to a school with an outstanding Ofsted report and good ranking in the borough. What the report or tables don't say is how many children have a tutor. If he is in higher set at the moment and being pushed by the teachers will he still get that in the new school? It makes sense for a school with poor performance to push the able ones to do well as this will reflect in the tables. Also the Ofsted reports should be taken with a good helping of salt. Often not worth the paper they are written on imho.

If I had my time again I don't think the Ofsted report would have any influence whatsoever in my decision. My other DD has now moved on to secondary school and we chose a so called "very good" school over an "outstanding" one.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:22 am
Posts: 3664
I think , from your post you have answered your own question and would probably prefer to move him. I'm sure if he is a friendly little boy he will soon settle in and the numerous children who have started over the years at my DC school have made friends etc amazingly quickly. He probably will have a little tizz about it and you should expect that.

My DC school was in special measures at one point and there was a mass exodus of literally half the school. Due to the close eye kept on them, a lot of things were improved and probably did help my children, although it does dip back down quite a lot too making me wish sometimes I had bitten the bullet with the rest. Speaking to other parents at outstanding schools they do seem to have issues also, albeit different ones ...so perhaps the grass isn't always greener !

See how you feel when you look round the school and then report back to us for an update . :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 7:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 1:03 pm
Posts: 1413
I second what Scarlett says. All schools need an eye kept on them but an outstanding school is keen to keep that status and will be trying to keep things as 'high' as they can. Your DS will need your support to make friendships, as much as your support on the academic side of things, as he adjusts to a new school. But he will do it, children are very adaptable, and it sounds like it will be the very best thing long-term. My DS has had loads of children come in and out of his class - one joined 5 weeks before the end of year 2 and it's like she's always been there!

It's a worrying time for you, anxious to make the right decision, but with you behind him, as you clearly are, I'm sure he'll thrive in the new school. Being closer to home must also be beneficial to you and must mean he'll have friends who live very close. :D

_________________
Seize the day ... before it seizes you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 7:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 5:27 pm
Posts: 3446
Location: london
I'd ignore Ofsted but I agree with Scarlett as well. Given that he will be moving school in 2 terms anyway, perhaps better to get 'used to ' the children who will be his class mates for the next 4 years.

_________________
mad?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2010 12:57 pm
Posts: 1446
Your child is not going to hate you! :? You are the adult and you will tell him, in a nice way, that he is moving school - it shouldn't be his decision. If he is guaranteed a place at the junior school then I would definitely move him now. If not, then I would wait until an offer from the junior school came before considering it.

Good luck.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:40 pm
Posts: 298
In our outstanding school they are so keen to hang on to their status that a lot is being swept under the carpet. I prefer schools to deal with their problems and in order to do so we they have to accept that there are problems in the first place.

Also Outstanding schools are less often inspected . We got a letter only at the end of last term saying that our next inspection had been deferred due to their outstanding status. This is despite parents taking children out because they believe the standard is falling like a brick.

Soon after being awarded our status, the best/most experienced teachers left because they were headhunted to work in so called "problem schools" the head left and the new head is often way to assist the LEA. The turn over of staff is shocking...

Children at the bottom and special needs are given a lot of help, which is great but no-one is very interested in the average child and the bright ones are bored because there is not point stretching him beyond a certain level apparently.

All I'm saying is that things are not always what they seem and with the right support at home I don't think it matters a lot which primary school you end up in. (I'm not talking Indies here).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:22 am
Posts: 3664
dani* wrote:
Children at the bottom and special needs are given a lot of help, which is great but no-one is very interested in the average child and the bright ones are bored because there is not point stretching him beyond a certain level apparently.



I used to think that , but I've since changed my mind. It might be just my DC school but my children have actually had a lot of extra imput ...they're not at the bottom ,but at some point they have had extra reading...additional support etc. I'm only human so of course it upsets me...we all want our children to sail through school and not be thought of as struggling. My DD is now having help with her literacy despite reaching level 3 in her year 2 sats...when I asked why I was told they had funding for so many children to take part in a reading programme and due to the tiny year group ( many children were pulled out of the school ) they have " used up " the places for children who normally wouldn't need it , but the teachers have chosen to help with confidence etc. Also when I said that all my DC have had extra help I was told it was because mine were considered to have great potential and just needed that extra push..it has certainly given the school their good results.

Parents I know who have children with learning difficulties are constantly upset as they are waiting ages for funding or their child just has 1 session a week to help them...which doesn't do much.

There are probably pros and cons to all types of schools. As Dani says what you do at home is just as important .


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016