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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:44 pm 
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Location: South Bucks
It seems that State school students with straight A grades are less likely to win places at Oxford University than those from private schools (with the SAME grades):

Bright state school pupils 'less likely to get into Oxford' http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/9062467/Bright-state-school-pupils-less-likely-to-get-into-Oxford.html


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:34 pm 
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This may or may not be the case. The reason I suggest that this report is not conclusive is because:
- there was no evidence to show that the A levels taken were similar eg similiar difficulty and relevant to the courses applied for.
- there has been previous data to show that state school pupils tend to apply for medicine, PPE etc which are incredibly popular courses. The data in this article is averaged across the courses so the conclusions may be distorted.

Why can't reports like this one use data that compares like with like and other factors instead of using selective data that can be used to fuel historical stereotypes!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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Not everyone thinks that Oxbridge is to place to be!

There are better courses elsewhere in some subjects.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 1:07 pm 
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Totally agree with Guest55. Aim for the best place for the course you want to do....that may not be Oxbridge!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 7:49 am 
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DD is at Oxford ( at a college which is supposed to be "posh" but isn't ) Most of her fellow students are from state schools with a further number from minor public schools. They are a very varied collection, many with the morals of your average alley cat (but that's another story).
What they do have in common though is more than A grades. For a start the admissions decisions are made on the basis of GCSE grades and AS modules, not A2 grades and almost every subject has an entry exam. Almost everyone has AS modules with UMS in the 90's and very few people have less than 2 A*s despite all having received an offer from Oxford of AAA.
For example (for history) anyone with even 5 GCSEs can put Oxford on their UCAS form and they will then sit the HAT (history aptitude test). The top 80% of candidates will then be invited to interview at which point its up to them not which school they attended. So it really is ridiculous that the media still harp on about stereotypes.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:05 am 
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Location: East Kent
I never thought I would see the day when I whole heartedly agree with you Magwich
:lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:28 am 
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Once a term DS's indie issues a newsletter. Joe Smith wins U12 Cross Country. School wins U15 Water Polo etc etc.

These boys, come Uni application time, will probably have an easier time distinguishing themselves from the other boys with AAA from indie OR state schools.

IMO Oxford & Co favour pupils from indies, not because of elitism or snobbery, but because they provide opportunities that may not be available to state school pupils, opportunities that allow them to stand out.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 11:01 am 
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Sorry - what 'opportunities' are these?

Please elaborate.

I cannot think of anything that my DC's state school doesn't offer ...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 11:56 am 
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Location: Berkshire
Pushy Dad wrote:
These boys, come Uni application time, will probably have an easier time distinguishing themselves from the other boys with AAA from indie OR state schools.

IMO Oxford & Co favour pupils from indies, not because of elitism or snobbery, but because they provide opportunities that may not be available to state school pupils, opportunities that allow them to stand out.


I'm not sure this is true. I've no experience of Oxbridge, but my three children, one of whom did a lot of extracurricular activity, and the other two who did not, all secured 5 good offers from Russell Group and 1994 group top universities, making me believe that the admissions departments at these universities are interested in one thing only -results. We even asked one person at Exeter, I think, how much weight was given to personal statements etc, and he replied not much :lol: Though that may depend on the course being applied for.My daughter spent a great deal of time on her PS for English - we felt it might have much more weight than an application say for Maths, due to the fact that you need to be able to show that you can write :lol:

As far as opportunities - I agree with G55, I do not believe that my children have been denied opportunity by attending state schools, and I'm far more ready to believe that if there is a bias (and from what I have read recently, I don't know that there is anymore), it will be because of the old boys network and/ or elitist behaviour.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:59 pm
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Quote:
IMO Oxford & Co favour pupils from indies, not because of elitism or snobbery, but because they provide opportunities that may not be available to state school pupils, opportunities that allow them to stand out


Complete rubbish, I’m afraid.

I was lucky enough to attend a Clarendon Group school myself; DS attends a high-achieving boys GS and has exactly the same opportunities that I did, either within the school itself or, in the case of some extracurricular activities, outside it. Whether he chooses to avail himself of them is another matter entirely, of course :D

In fact, in my particular field of expertise you could argue that the truly talented will have greater opportunities away from the independent sector as they will not find the required level of competition within school.


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