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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:12 am 
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My dd has quite a lot of homework in Y7 (2-3 subjects a night) and insists on bringing almost all her books to and from school daily. Her bag is always completely full and very heavy and I wondered about buying a wheeled backpack like the Jansport Driver 8. My worry is that the other children will make fun of her, but I'm worried about her back! Has anyone tried one of these, and if so how did ther child find it (practically and socially)?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:08 am 
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My friend's DD wheels her skiing gear in something like that once a week. Apart from that I've never seen anyone with the wheeled backback, and I live near the selective girls school. What does your DD thinks of the idea?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:42 am 
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I have to say I suspect the micky would be taken out of her. Bags seem to be a very emotive thing at this stage - our DD was one of the last in her year to move from the plain black sensible rucksack to (usually) one of the - Cath Kidston type over shoulder bags. She has one that goes across the chest not just over the shoulder - and also had to prove that she was going to only bring home the books she needed rather than all of them! I have to say we found out the book thing was cos her locker had sticky gunge at the bottom and did not lock properly - so once that was sorted it was easier.

I would talk to your DD. Mine had very definite ideas!! :roll: Why does she need to bring all her books home - is her locker OK?
Good luck!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 9:00 am 
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Lots of kids do it at Purcell with all their school and music books - more music books than school books - but it's not the type of environment where one would get bullied for it as there are plenty kids with green hair and weird piercings there anyway!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:45 am 
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I would always put health first. You are taking about her health for the rest of her life.

Fortunately for me, my DD positively likes to do something different from everyone else, so teasing is not really an issue for her. She would be quite likely to give them a lecture about sensible behaviour and health if she did get teased. But DD is one of those whose lead others follow, so there is not such an issue.
It depends on your DC and their response to teasing. My DCs have been brought up to be firm about their individuality and not succumb to peer pressure on issues that will effect their health or sensible behaviour.

There are some really fun rolling bags around aimed at the travel market. There are also some which double up as a seat if they are tired or waiting for the bus. I suppose the trick is to make her rolling bag look "cool". I saw a pupil with a rolling bag that looks like a tiger on a lead, but would that conform to school rules? do they have rules on bags? My DD had a bright orange rucksack with large japanese flowers on it. When that we bought a plain bag and some fabric paints so she personalised it herself.
Your DD could start her own trend.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:03 pm 
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Within reason they can have anything. DD uses a purple Nothface rucksack which matches her uniform, and a Cath Kidston tote for around school which she sometimes splits the books into to come home. Currents her bag weighs about 7kgs, and despite constantly asking her to only bring home a couple of days homework at a time she (and her friends) carry all of it. On Thursdays she also brings all her PE kit so it's more like 9kgs!
:shock:


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 9:26 am 
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Why does she "need" to have all her books at school every day? Does she really need them? Sounds like a Y7 thing to me. Last year DS started of wanting to take all his books with him every day, but we insisted that we didn't need to, and we've been proved right.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 9:38 am 
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I know we worry about our kids backs but do you know any adult that has been severely affected or even affected at all by school bags? Think of the kids in Africa who carry 10kg water bottles ten miles on their heads. Bags aren't carried any distance for long periods and us adults are all fine, aren't we? My bag was always very weighty.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 12:27 pm 
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As an adult I've always found carrying a decent heavy rucksack, with the weight evenly distributed, no problem at all. It's lopsided actions like a heavy bag on the shoulder (or maybe pushing one of those wheely things) that are more likely to do some damage isn't it? My mother was always tut tutting about my heavy bag and what damage it would do me, but she would never buy a rucksack as she thought that was even worse. I could never see why but it wasn't worth arguing.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 1:19 pm 
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Waiting_For_Godot wrote:
Think of the kids in Africa who carry 10kg water bottles ten miles on their heads

This is the best method for carrying heavy weights and does not equate to our DCs carrying things in a lopsided way.
When carrying on the head, the weight is supported by the whole column of the body and the balance requires (so promotes) perfect posture too. The widespread use of carrying on the head across Africa and Asia shows that this is a proven ideal method for carriage of heavy things. It is efficient and does not produce any strains or aches (if done right). It is amazing what can be carried in this way . i remember seeing a chap in Tanzania with an armchair on his head :D

Maybe our DCs should learn how to do it from infancy :D

I do not remember ever having to carry as many things as they seem to have these days.


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