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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:54 am
Posts: 299
My children (13 ds and 11 dd) will be having nearly 2 months of summer holidays

Would like to know how to keep them busy, am not looking at options to keep them busy at home but I am looking to know if they can do some volunteering work or working at charity shops for free etc. I am sure they can not earn money as that may be treated as child labour :)

I have no plans to join them in summer camps and no holiday plans, hence they will be merely sitting at home for 50 days. It is too much to expect them to read books, play games, learn new language etc always, so they need to go out and do something like working for charity etc

Please share your ideas and if you have tried anything similar to this


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 8:55 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
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Location: East Kent
as far as I am aware children under 13 are not allowed to work.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 8:55 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:51 am
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Ummmmm.....how about taking them on holiday, or maybe letting them have a life! :)


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 8:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
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Location: Reading
Why not holiday clubs? None available?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:06 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 12:06 pm
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Location: Birmingham
I fully agree with your thoughts. My eldest boys spent quite a while last summer - with another friend - volunteering at a Muslim charity.
They filled small packs of water (Zamzam water from Makkah) and dates that were given out to donors (it was Ramadhan and a very busy time for Muslim charities) and also sold dates in the shop (traditional for breaking the fast).

I was so pleased that they were kept busy and learned to be of service to others. They were around 'Uncles' who are good friends of our family and provided good conversation and guidance for them. The alternative was spending the whole day in bed (the eldest) or watching/playing rubbish on the computer (the second).

Holiday clubs can be nice - but the only ones that cater for teenagers tend to be extremely expensive (£50 a day :shock: ), and they seem to be more about hedonism than selflessness. There are only so many other activities they can go to - they had a few days at the cinema, and ski-ing, and went bowling once - but that's about it. We live in a busy city area and there's nowhere safe to just 'play out' either.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:24 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Yes I quite like this idea too - however I think you will struggle at this age ( unless you have an option like Um's) to get them charity work without an adult going with them.

If they will be at home on their own for 50 days it's hard for it not to turn out a bit like you describe .... mine would eat sweets all day I think, and leave the wrappers on the floor.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:36 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 pm
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I've spent a fortune on many sorts of holiday clubs over the years and the main memories seem to be of how horrible some of the other participants (and sometimes, the leaders!) have been. For me it is what hard work it was labelling things, dealing with lunches, getting them there on time etc. This year mostly they will be at home minding the dog and littering the house.

I think there are too many problems with liability and child protection for kids to do charity without parents in tow.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:01 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:08 pm
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Our local libraries are always keen for volunteers to help with their summer reading scheme, but I think they have to be 14. Our local country park will take volunteer junior rangers but this is aimed at D of E participants so again would probably need to be 14 plus.
There are opportunities out there but I think your DC's may still be a bit too young. Also it may be a bit late for this summer, our library scheme for instance volunteers had to apply by april.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:29 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
http://www.do-it.org.uk/wanttovolunteer ... orunder16s

might be worth looking at?


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:54 am
Posts: 299
@yoyo123: u may be right but i thought volunteering is ok but looks like that is also not allowed. but some choldren do car wash ,what is called then ? . I will check your website but it is too much to research then visit local centres and finally it will turn out to be no or they expect an adult to be accompanied

@sonasona:holiday may be for 5 days but not for 50 days :) . having their own life, what they do generally is watching telly, facebook, skype etc. I dont want that to happen. They dont much like playing on streets.

@Tinkers: holiday clubs are not worth as far as i can see and they are not affordable

Govt should do something which will make childrens holidays more meaningful, productive and useful for society

I spoke to a charity shop today and they said no unless child is in yr 10


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