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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 12:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:28 am
Posts: 1773
So ds left school last week and is in the twixt-schools limbo before starting his new senior school in September.

The problem is he is already pretty bored. We work from home so don't have a lot of time to do stuff with him during the day and as such, he just kicks about on his own or plays on the computer; none of which is ideal. His sister finishes school tomorrow so he will be able to do a certain amount of things with her until her patience runs out!

Last summer was filled with preparation for the grammar exam and was pretty full-on as we didn't have a tutor. He would happily play on the computer all day every day but obviously that's not good for him.

So, does anyone have any recommendations for good websites that are slightly educational (so he doesn't run a mile) and therefore has to think a bit, but are still fun? Or any other ideas? Cheers.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 12:24 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
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Location: Buckinghamshire
http://freerice.com/#/english-vocabulary/1418 Hugely addictive, and a worthy cause too.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:34 pm
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I've got much the same problem with my ds .....today he has at least got a friend round but they are both playing computer or video games. :roll: We are off to the Air Tattoo at Fairford on Friday so that gives us one day out. Ds has already said he will happily go on a PGL holiday for a week .......but funds are a bit limited this year so that probably is not going to happen. DD is loving working her way through the NICAS gradings at the climbing wall in Gloucester but cannot get DS vaguely interested in that. All ideas welcome.....


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:59 am
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My strongest thoughts are that if you could spend time with him tutoring for the 11+ last year, why can't you spend equal time with him enjoying his company this summer?
I understand your circumstances may have changed of course.

Football/sports/trampoline academy is about 15-20 a day usually, that will keep him fit too as no pe.

Programme in a friend every week to yours and him going to them.

A huge room clear out, old clothes, old toys, old books, making way for big school stuff.

Can he help you with filing or basic admin?

Prepping him for independent travel is always good, send him to the local shop, get him on his cycle to friends houses.

We always choose an artist or print designer and look at their work and copy their style, I pin up the results to cheer my kitchen up as they are getting rather good as the boys get older.

Cinemas offer junior film showings for a few pounds, they are u or pg rating so eleven year olds can go together without parents if you see them into the cinema and collect them.

My sons always seem to enjoy digging huge holes, not sure why, I think Louis sacceur may have a lot to answer for!

1m2 of garden is a nice one too, it's not too late for radish, lettuce, crysanthemum cuttings, candytuft, or a few instant plants. Youngest (11) is currently labelling his garden plot with the posh names he looks up....I haven't had the heart to point out that felt pen isn't always water resistant.

The library holds free or v cheap morning workshops every summer round here, ten/eleven/twelve is probably the top age range of these groups, but the boys enjoy them.

Other things do seem to involve parents I'm afraid, although there are tasks you can just pop in and out for.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 2:17 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 2356
He definitely needs a project!
The gardening idea sounds great.
Does he have any interest in crafts of any kind?
Up cycling a piece of charity shop furniture for his bedroom?
Learning to cook - are some good children's cook books where he could teach himself and cook lunch for you all.
Could he earn pocket money by doing household chores during the day so you have more time together after work?
Is there anything he could get involved with to help with your work in a similar way?

Has he checked local sports clubs, youth clubs, schools, churches etc to see if there is anything going on in the way of cheap summer activities?

Do you have any elderky neighbours it would be safe for him to visit or help? The same with a neighbour with much younger children who might be grateful of an older child go play with them while they have a rest/ get some ironing done etc.

Sewing name labels on his new uniform :)


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:59 am
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Quote:
Sewing name labels on his new uniform :)


:lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:02 pm
Posts: 2149
Craft projects always went down well in this house. Airfix? That takes a nice long time to finish, depending on patience levels...

Library reading scheme/craft activities as mentioned.

Having a plan/rough timetable for each week can work rather than just drifting.

I always paid for one week per child in the summer holiday of chosen sport/dance/drama workshop but it depends on your budget and ability to drop off/pick up.

Meeting local friends, even just to walk to the playground/hang out at each other's houses together.

Online scrabble/anagram games where they play someone in real time.

Actual board games eg scrabble, monopoly, boggle slam, rummikub, if someone to play with.

We often used Tesco Clubcard deals for days out but then that was because I'm around in the holidays. Or being near London the Sceince museum or whatever.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 3:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:02 pm
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Another idea: in the holidays before starting Year 7 my DD's new school asked them all to make a timeline/scrapbook of their life so far, which she found very interesting and stimulating. She looked for old photos and gathered together certificates, ticket stubs and any other bits and pieces she'd amassed (bit of a hoarder!), planned it out chronologically, stuck things in and wrote captions. They took them in during the first week at school and looked through each other's timelines as part of the induction process. Even if not required to do so by the school, might he like to do something like that for his own benefit/memories?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 3:41 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:02 pm
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Is he interested in history? Love this!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-33536118


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 12:06 pm
Posts: 2093
Location: Birmingham
There are often sports courses going on in the holidays...ask at your local library for the details?
Some council also have free sessions.


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