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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2014 12:16 pm
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I need some information about the admission criteria for universities.
If a child because of parents jobs and any family problems does his schooling out of UK but is a UK national. Then what will be the admission criteria for him?
What will be the fee structure? Because it will not be his fault at all. He is dependant on parents.
One of my friends health problems she shifted out of UK for her medical treatment which is not available in UK. Her son wants to do graduation in the university here and he is UK citizen.
I need some information on this. Will he be considered eligible?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 4:42 pm 
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Location: Essex
Normally, one would have to have been resident in the UK for the previous 3 years to qualify as a home student, I think. The information is probably in here:

http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/International-Students/Fees--finance/Home-or-Overseas-fees/England-Higher-Education/#

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:11 pm 
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Usually needs to be 3 years to be considered home student. Exception is residents in the EU who can attend Scottish Unis with the same fees as Scottish residents


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:32 pm 
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[quote="hermanmunster"] Usually needs to be 3 years to be considered home student. Exception is residents in the EU who can attend Scottish Unis with the same fees as Scottish residents [/quote]


Which is currently £0.00. Doesn't apply to residents of the rest of the UK, so if your DC really want to go to a Scottish university, move to somewhere EU in good time.

Not much help if your friends are resident outside the EU, though, mgm :( .

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:07 pm 
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She is not EU resident. She is British Citizen but because of her medical treatment she is shifted out of UK . Obviously child went with her.
So in this case why child has to show his 3 years residency?
What about Masters studies?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:12 pm 
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"She is not EU resident. She is British Citizen but because of her medical treatment she is shifted out of UK . Obviously child went with her.
So in this case why child has to show his 3 years residency?"

Because those are the rules and the child is her dependent so the expectation is that of course the child would go with her. The point is that if you are living here for 3 years (or more) you are paying tax and contributing to the British economy directly and, therefore, indirectly to the universities. This is what entitles you to pay the home fees...


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:29 pm 
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But child's father is in UK and paying the tax so why child's residency?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 9:40 pm 
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Looking at the UKCISA site, being a British Citizen means that he meets the 'settled in the UK', I think. However, he also needs to be 'ordinarily resident' here. If he spends a significant part of the year (school holidays?) with the parent who is physically resident in the UK it would appear that there is a chance that 'ordinary residence' can be claimed in both the UK and the country where he lives with his mother. The best thing to do would be to contact UKCISA via the 'contact us' link at the bottom of their Web pages.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 8:40 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
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Location: East Kent
ToadMum wrote:
The best thing to do would be to contact UKCISA via the 'contact us' link at the bottom of their Web pages.


I agree, while we can speculate and google bits for you, UKCISA are the ones who actually know!


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 9:10 am 
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Thanks a lot.


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