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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 5:23 pm 
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Posts: 11949
I thought some of our posters might be interested in this news:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-35496893


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 6:09 pm 
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comment from Astérix and Obélix :wink: :

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ils+s ... q9KL_qM%3A

Comment from Idéfix:
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ils+s ... 2KBLbNM%3A


Article of The Guardian posted by Amber and articles and vidéos in French on this thread:
viewtopic.php?f=57&t=45228&start=320

Please, do continue to learn properly the French accents (all of them, circumflex included!) when you learn your vocab. :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 11:09 pm 
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Fixing awkward or illogical spelling is one thing, but the circumflex was one of the more helpful and easy things to learn in French. Removing it is ridiculous.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 9:40 am 
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Stroller wrote:
the circumflex was one of the more helpful and easy things to learn in French. Removing it is ridiculous.

+1

Stroller wrote:
Fixing awkward or illogical spelling is one thing

I am sure that most of the illogical spelling have an history behind them. The etymology of words is always quite fascinating! :D

For example, this strange word 'oignon' (= onion in English) has this 'chain of paternity':
from Latin: ūniō, ūniōnem
from Old French: oingnun, unniun
From Middle French: oingnon
Hence the letter g in the French word 'oignon' while the English word did not follow this evolution.


What would interest me is to know the raison why a letter 'g' has been added during the evolution between the Latin and the Old French. :D


Last edited by JaneEyre on Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:59 pm 
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Quote:
The etymology of words is always quite fascinating! :D


As I am plodding (but with joy! :D ) on analysing Macbeth for an essay, I am yet again today excited about the evolution of words. I am analysing this line:
‘If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair’
(1.3.134 in the Longman edition)

In these lines, the noun ’suggestion’ has not at all the modern meaning of ‘an idea, plan, or action that is suggested (or the act of suggesting it)’ (cambridge dictionary definition). It means ‘a tempting image’ as indeed, in Middle English, a suggestion was ‘an incitement to evil’.

Fascinating , isn’t it? All languages are fascinating!
I have heard that the book Mother Tongue: The Story of the English Language by Bill Bryson is a great read. I have put it on my list of 'books to read'. :D


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 2:15 pm 
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JaneEyre, do you speak Russian?
If not, I strongly suggest you learn. I know you would enjoy it.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 3:25 pm 
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Really, why is that? Are there plenty of wonderful roots? Or is it the evolution of the language which is fascinating?

I know Classical Arabic (to some extent of course) which is also based on all a system of roots. Can you imagine that a three letter root-verb can have up to 12 (or 13? I cannot remember :? ) derived forms (but not all root-verbs have all of them), and this is without mentioning the active, passive forms, etc. It is a whole world with a lot of logic in it! :D

It might seem strange but I really miss Latin and Ancient Greek. Reading poem titles like 'Apologia pro Poemate Meo' or 'Praematuri' make me want to study Latin once again, except that I know I have no time for that. And as I used to prefer Greek to Latin, maybe I will have to look towards studying it again when I will be an old grandma on her rocking chair (with a cat on the lap!), no more able to be very active in the ‘big wild world’? :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 3:55 pm 
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So it seems that the 'Acadamie Francais' has the authority to decide how French words should officially be spelled? Is this only within France itself or does it extend to all French speaking countries? (e.g. Canada).

Anyone know if we have anything like this for English? I'm not aware of any official body other than perhaps the OED but I don't think that's quite the same is it?


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:09 pm 
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Hi Proud Dad

Yes, in France, it is 'l'Académie française' which decides the evoution of the French language. I do not think this is applicable in Canada as really, the French spoken over there hurts my ears at times!!! And reading a BIG panel written on it 'Nous sommes déménagés' (instead of 'Nous avons déménagé') made me think that I would have a lot of difficulties to get used to live in a country with such a 'funny' French. (we thought about migrating there 2 years ago and had a tour of a school).

No, in Engand, there isn't a special body similar to l' Académie française (as explained to me by a professor of literature at the University of Birmingham). However, some evolution might be decided at Cambridge or Oxford :? . Anyone knows more about that?


Last edited by JaneEyre on Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:43 pm 
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I guess Canadian French is a bit like American English in that sense with different spellings etc?

No I'm not aware of any "Ministry of Spelling and Grammar" in this country.

The French do seem to be particularly protective of their language though don't they?


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