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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 9:44 pm 
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Why there is ever increasing demand for grammar schools?
Every year the competition increases..the number of children appearing also increase every year ...I know independent school are best the comes grammar schools (free) but what happens to public schools? And the students who study in public schools
Heard that while applying for Uni they consider independent school students then grammar school and public schools... Is that true?
Have seen grammar schools results 100% GCSEs results and most of the students in A/A*
Is that the reason we all parents prefer grammar schools or any other reasons
Can someone share their views pls ?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:04 pm 
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Location: Essex
redbrige wrote:
Why there is ever increasing demand for grammar schools?
Every year the competition increases..the number of children appearing also increase every year ...I know independent school are best the comes grammar schools (free) but what happens to public schools? And the students who study in public schools
Heard that while applying for Uni they consider independent school students then grammar school and public schools... Is that true?
Have seen grammar schools results 100% GCSEs results and most of the students in A/A*
Is that the reason we all parents prefer grammar schools or any other reasons
Can someone share their views pls ?


I'm not sure what you are categorising as public schools? Public schools in the UK are independent schools, so those two categories are not mutually exclusive. Do you mean state schools which are not grammar schools, i.e. comprehensive schools / upper schools / high schools / (secondary) 'modern' schools, nomenclature depending on the LEA?

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:23 pm 
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Also, Universities are now encouraged to accept more students from state schools, ahead of grammar schools and private schools, in order to widen participation.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:42 pm 
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Location: Herts
I am not of the opinion that independent schools are best and nor are the universities. They choose the student, not the school and will in fact be much more interested in a student
that has managed to do really well in an underperforming school than one who has had small class sizes and lots of help along the way.

Parents should choose the school that is best for their student, for some that might be the local school, others the grammar or private. Parents need to do their research with their student and circumstances in mind.

Numbers of students sitting selective exams are increasing everywhere and I think it will get worse. Many parents think their student will do better in a selective and I am one of them. Just tonight the parent of a Y9 girl in our local comp told me that things were fine in sets one and two but the bottom sets were very disruptive. However this does not have to be the case. I know of a fantastic bottom maths set when 8 students were taught so well they were really to move up in weeks but of course did not want to go.

Do your research and find your best local school. DG


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:55 pm 
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Location: Essex
kenyancowgirl wrote:
Also, Universities are now encouraged to accept more students from state schools, ahead of grammar schools and private schools, in order to widen participation.


Possibly making the generous bursaries available from some independent schools a bit of a poisoned chalice? Or is the teacher writing one's UCAS reference meant to make sure that s/he mentions ones financially assisted status at the school?

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 11:07 pm 
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Location: Cheshire
ToadMum wrote:
Possibly making the generous bursaries available from some independent schools a bit of a poisoned chalice?


Correct imo, even if on a full bursary you have had the advantage of smaller classes and generally x3 more investment into your senior education.If I was a university admin officer it would make no difference that you were a bursary child or full paying student -unfair advantage if an unfair advantage.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 8:08 am 
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Interestingly, I read recently that smaller class sizes are not proven to make any significant impact...I can't remember where it was but will try and find the link.

The most high achieving private secondary school locally (and another one not so far away) do not have what most people would refer to as small class sizes (around 25/26) - neither of these are the most expensive, as larger class sizes allow them to keep their costs lower. The ones which have classes of under 20, locally, are by far the more expensive and have pretty "meh" academic achievement - they are full of children who "failed" to pass the 11+ and the more stringent entrance tests for the larger, more academic private schools (and I use the word "failed" advisedly!) I am fully aware that schools are more than the sum of their academic levels - and am not a fan of private education per se but it does strike me that some of the "smaller" schools advertise on this "perceived benefit" when in reality they are only offering a higher expense.

Very broadly speaking, a bright child in an under performing school would be rated positively by universities; an equivalently bright child from a grammar school would be rated more highly than an equivalently bright child from a private school. I think many parents are beginning to realise about perceived versus actual benefits. They are also conscious that if they invest in primary, allowing access to a selective state education, they are increasing their actual benefit whilst saving themselves a huge amount financially.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:51 am 
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Has this been driven by the article in the Sunday Times today? Will try to link later when not on my phone.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 11:14 am 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-31087545

Myth 4

Loathe as I am to quote PISA, it is not the only piece of 'evidence' which has consistently demonstrated that class size is unrelated to outcomes. Of course, that is not going to convince those parents who believe that paying for a school will give their child an advantage by improving teacher ratios. And for many, it is more about the TLC a child who may have social or pastoral issues will receive in a more intimate learning environment. What it doesn't do is improve results, and I assume that is what this thread is really about.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 4:22 pm 
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http://thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/Magazin ... -and-2.1.5
Unfortunately it is behind a paywall.


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