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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 4:51 pm 
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Jane Eyre and Gulliver’s Travels will be some of the literary treats offered to schools thanks to Penguin and Schools Minister Nick Gibb.

Anna Karenina, The Thirty-Nine Steps and Twelve Years a Slave are among 100 titles being offered as part of a new initiative from Penguin Classics, following a call for action by Schools Minister Nick Gibb to ensure there is more classic literature being taught in our schools.

The 100 titles - taken from Penguin’s popular Black Classics series - range from the earliest writings to early 20th century works, span fiction and non-fiction, poetry and prose, and are intended to offer a springboard for children to discover the classics. All the titles are by authors who died before 1946 and are therefore out of copyright.

Penguin is offering secondary schools classroom sets of 30 copies of each of the 100 titles for a package price of £3,000, allowing pupils to read along with their teacher and classmates.

The Schools Minister wants to encourage debate and discussion among students and members of the public on what classic literature should be read in the classroom.

Schools Minister Nick Gibb said:

It is important that all pupils in secondary school are taught to read and enjoy challenging books from amongst the world’s greatest literature. The first few years of secondary education is an opportunity for pupils to be introduced to such literature free from the constraints and analysis of public exams.

I welcome this initiative from Penguin and look forward to seeing the list grow so schools can discover great books together.

But this is not the end of the debate and I want this to be a springboard for discussion on the impact a great story can have on us all.


Simon Winder, Publishing Director, Penguin Classics said:

For 70 years, Penguin Classics have been introducing the world’s most extraordinary books to millions of readers. The Classics in Schools initiative is a fantastic opportunity to continue with what has always been our mission - to get remarkable, good-value books into the hands of as many people as possible.

We have chosen 100 books from the Penguin Classics series to continue our tradition of engaging the next generation - to surprise, provoke and delight young readers. The opportunity to work with schools to make these 100 books available to their students is a unique one and we are thrilled to be involved.


Nick Gibb wants to encourage more secondary schools to read together as a whole class, ensuring all pupils leave school well read and with an appreciation of a wide range of authors, genres and texts. The list from Penguin Classics is intended to broaden the literature which pupils are exposed to and allow them to enjoy stories and authors which might otherwise be beyond their individual reading level.

The move builds on government reforms which have transformed the way young people learn to read. Since the introduction of the phonics screening check in 2012, 120,000 more children are on track to becoming excellent readers.

The government has already made more than £20 million available for schools to buy and develop resources for teaching phonics. Those who do not reach the threshold in the light-touch check are given extra reading help by their teachers so they catch up early in their school career, before it is too late.

[...]
As part of a limited period offer, schools will be able to purchase classroom sets for the equivalent of £1 per copy between March and June 2016, for delivery in time for the new school term in September 2016.

The full list of 100 titles in the Penguin Classics initiative is available:
http://edu.penguinclassics.co.uk/

source:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new- ... e-launched

My comment: do schools have to pay for these books or are they offered to schools?


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 5:18 pm 
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Anything with that man's name on it brings me out in hives I'm afraid.

Possibly this is a marvellous new initiative with the well being of young people at its heart.

If so - well there is a first time for everything I suppose and we are all capable of change.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 5:39 pm 
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I'm still chuckling at a Penguin being called Nick Gibb!!

:lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 6:59 pm 
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Amber wrote:
Possibly this is a marvellous new initiative with the well being of young people at its heart.

Mr Gove had chucked out all American literature form the new English GCSE (is it the same for English A levels?). At least, I can notice in the list of 100 books that there are Russian, German , Italian and French authors. There are even The Bhagavad Gita, The Analects by Confucius, The Odyssey by Homer, The Conference Of The Birds by Farid Attar,etc. So the list has been writen with an open mind!! :D :D Isn't this positive?


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:23 pm 
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I doubt there are (m)any secondary schools that could afford the "package price of £3000" as that is probably more than the entire annual budget of most English departments. Good money earner for Penguin if anyone does take it up though.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:48 pm 
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At the risk of being contaversial what about some English Classics :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:49 pm 
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Yes, the schools won't need 30 books from each titles as they will not be studied in class (except maybe the set texts for GCSE like Jane Eyre, Romeo And Juliet, etc. and maybe there are better editions for these texts than the Penguin one!).
As the French say, it rather seem to be ‘un coup d'épée dans l'eau’ = ‘a sword strike in the water’ :(
I am struggling to find the equivalent English idiom… :( Is it ‘just an empty gesture’?


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:50 pm 
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doodles wrote:
At the risk of being contaversial what about some English Classics :lol: :lol:

Are you Mr Gove, Doodles? :wink: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:55 pm 
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....because no teacher would have thought of using classic literature in their lessons before now, we should be grateful, Mr Gibbs.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:01 pm 
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JaneEyre wrote:
Amber wrote:
Possibly this is a marvellous new initiative with the well being of young people at its heart.
I feel like one of those reviewers of films who actually says something like 'oh dear me what a terrible waste of an evening - this really isn't such a great film' and the quote on the poster is 'such a great film'. :?

JaneEyre wrote:
I am struggling to find the equivalent English idiom…
Suggestions on a postcard chaps. Is 'cynical and ultimately totally meaningless but Daily Mail friendly political gesture' an idiom? Or could anyone offer a short, one word paraphrase?

(Sorry JE - really can't imagine this man has anything good or worthwhile to offer to teachers).


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