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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:30 am
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I could cry. :(

My screen mad son, who is saved from the screens and boredom by a healthy interest in sport that does his so much good on so many levels, has just been diagnosed with Osgood Schlatters disease. Ironic that it is a disease of active adolescents in growth spurts when he is the smallest child I know of his age and hardly grows at all!

Its becoming more and more pronounced and we have to stop his beloved free running class, I only hope he can still trampoline and play rugby, but I'm not sure and I dread, absolutely dread, him not being able to do sport. Its a saviour for him and the only thing that gets him outside (he hates walking, dog, with me, anything)

Has anyone else had to deal with this? I know I should be thankful, - God willing he is a healthy child, but it feels like such a cruel blow to have the thing that makes him happy and manageable and does him so much good, slowly taken away.

In the midst of it, please excuse the pity party :(


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:11 pm 
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Yamin - first don't panic! Always scary to get a diagnosis and god knows - we know about that!

If it helps, 2 boys I know very well have the same diagnosis (in ds1s year) and, whilst both of them have had time off rugby (one missed most of a season but is due back for tour) and one missed the back end of last season, the prognosis for both has not been long term doom and gloom.

They were basically told to stop doing it for a particular period, lots of physio and, as I said, one is back and the other is coming back. Yes it was painful for them but the pain was a sign to stop whilst the growing caught up (can you tell I am not a medical expert?!)

What I am trying to say is that although it feels as if the bottom has fallen out of your world, it is apparently a really common thing that does appear a lot in rugby players (something to do with changing direction quickly) of a certain age but it is not necessarily life changing although certainly inhibiting for periods of time.

Chin up!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:15 pm 
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Oh Yamin I feel so sorry for you and your DS, I do appreciate how hard it is for a sporty boy to be denied his "thing", albeit in our case only for a short time (crutches and plaster casts etc) On a positive note a rugby friend of DS was diagnosed with this in yr7 and he continued to do some sport and now seems to be ok.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:15 pm 
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Location: Buckinghamshire
Poor you and him, Yamin. :(

You may find that stopping Parkour improves things enough that he can still carry on with the rest of his sports. Parkour is exciting but it is very hard on the joints, especially when it goes wrong. DS did it for a while but after the 3rd or 4th injury to his knees and ankles even he decided to call time on it.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:29 pm 
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Yamin, I'll PM you.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:31 pm 
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So sorry to hear that Yamin.

I also know boys who've had this and, with rest, they have been able to take up sport again after a year or so.

It is a warning to the body so think positively - no permanent damage has been done yet :)

At least the rugby season is over at school.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:43 pm 
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Big hugs Yamin. DD2 had this in Y7, she too was small (tiny in fact) and a gymnast (5 days a week) so it had a huge impact on her life at the time and I was distraught for her BUT, lots (and I mean LOTS) of physio and some serious rest meant that after 6 months or so things were back to normal. She wore a special knee strap and maintained some exercise, largely S & C, so that when she 'came back' she was not too far behind. It was a total pain, but they do grow out of it, once the tendons have had a chance to catch up with their bone growth. Good luck.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:48 pm 
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What a LOVELY lot you all are. Thank you so much. I know I'm making a big fuss and of course people are coping with far worse. It just feels so unfair.

But all of you make really good points and such encouraging stories. I'm going to answer below


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:30 am
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kenyancowgirl wrote:
Yamin - first don't panic! Always scary to get a diagnosis and god knows - we know about that!

If it helps, 2 boys I know very well have the same diagnosis (in ds1s year) and, whilst both of them have had time off rugby (one missed most of a season but is due back for tour) and one missed the back end of last season, the prognosis for both has not been long term doom and gloom.

They were basically told to stop doing it for a particular period, lots of physio and, as I said, one is back and the other is coming back. Yes it was painful for them but the pain was a sign to stop whilst the growing caught up (can you tell I am not a medical expert?!)

What I am trying to say is that although it feels as if the bottom has fallen out of your world, it is apparently a really common thing that does appear a lot in rugby players (something to do with changing direction quickly) of a certain age but it is not necessarily life changing although certainly inhibiting for periods of time.

Chin up!


Thanks KCG, its a bummer but I know its common and its great to hear such encouraging stories of others. This is our other son not at KES and being a twin he is so competitive and was loving keeping up with bro who is steaming ahead now on free running. Such a shame, but yes, not long term doom and gloom. It could be so much worse.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:50 pm 
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doodles wrote:
Oh Yamin I feel so sorry for you and your DS, I do appreciate how hard it is for a sporty boy to be denied his "thing", albeit in our case only for a short time (crutches and plaster casts etc) On a positive note a rugby friend of DS was diagnosed with this in yr7 and he continued to do some sport and now seems to be ok.



I'm hoping it won't mean elimination of all sport - its good to hear that some do manage to carry on with something to maintain benefits and fitness. Thank you


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