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PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
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Dear All

An interesting read.....

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/publications/i ... 6&type=pdf

Comments appreciated

Patricia


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 10:41 pm 
Hi,

The link you give is a 58 page document.

I presume that this is the one showing that Boys are now attaining the same level of grades that girls did 7 years prior.

Does this suggest that modern exams with their enormous course work element are more geared towards the lass than the lad?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 7:54 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
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Location: Berks,Bucks
Yes, it is. It is big, but more readable than other documents of this type.

Just a few comments, more questions that answers...

If you look at the table at the end, it is clear that the divide is per subject. Boys to as well or better in Sciences subjects, and the problem is clearly with the 'Arts'.
This is roughly in line with the typical male,female behaviour where males find it harder to express themselves and communicate effectively... Any theory about this?

The methods for improving boys standard are, besides using more scientific approaches , all about good teaching practice I think. Does it mean that girls are more accepting of bad situations, and is it a good thing?

I was wondering whether these findings apply to the average boy who would do slighly worse in many subjects, or to some boys falling in specific categories.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 8:32 pm 
An interesting read, (albeit lengthy!!). I also read some of the the other ofsted report mentioned in the report, about boys writing!!!

The tests were held in schools, both Primary and Secondary, which preformed well academically and the gender gap, was less than the norm.
Interestingly they found that single gender schools did no better than mixed schools.

Nothing could be pin pointed as a quick fix. A mix of things were seen in all these schools, some of which were, Good teaching practise as well as a stricter environment, setting boundries. A high learning ethos, good feedback, and subtle guidance from teachers (Showing boys that what they were doing was in line with requirements, and what they needed to do, to improve.) Parental support, and smaller targets to name a few.

It was also noted that girls were better at rising above indifferent teaching and get what they needed from a lesson.

Bringing to mind.....
Getting youngest yr4 son to sit down and write a book review for homework recently, was no easy chore. The teacher had said: in no more than 50 words, which was his main focus.
Going through what was required, then spending 40mins on this, inevitably put him over the 50 word threshold. Of course he was now worried about his teachers reponse to the 50word limit.......... He was given a single tick for his effort. No verbal comment either.

Whilst I appreciate teachers usually have 30+ homeworks to mark, the report does shed some light on how certain things come about.

I now understand his thinking: Why put in so much effort, do the bare minimum, as it makes little difference to the reaction to my work!

:?
RR


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:49 pm 
I really feel for your son. All that effort and no positive comment. Have these teachers never heard of 'emotional intelligence'. My second (very bright) son is now in year 5. He has previously spent 5 years drifting at school because he is in the top groups and bored out of his brain because he feels he has been 'taught' absolutely nothing until this year. He now has a teacher who recognises him as an individual, sets tasks according to his ability and comments constructively on all his homework tasks to help him improve. She is the first teacher to do this since he started at primary school. Consequently he is putting in far more effort, enjoys school, says positive things about his teacher for the first time ever and comes out with a smile on his face every day. He is also getting top grades for his effort (and boy does he want to please her).

Very much a case of previously not 'rising above indiferent teaching' as Catherine quoted from the document. My experience would suggest its not the boys that are the problem but the system (more accurately the teaching staff - especially at primary school) who seem to be failing them. My son is at a school where every member of staff is female. I do wonder if more male role models would be beneficial.

Any comments from those with male teachers?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 10:08 am 
Sorry, just to clarify, I've mixed up info from two reports.
As I also read most of the ofsted report 'Yes he can - Schools where boys write well'.......... http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/assets/3317.pdf
This report viewed work at both Primary and Secondary schools, not the first one Patricia mentions.

Thanks Guest65 for your kind words. I't's good to know your son has finally come across a teacher who cares. There are still a few left out there then!! :wink: Unfortunately my oldest is the bright one, and still floundering about in the Primary school melee.
One thing that all the children (who's parents frequent these boards) have, is PARENTAL support, but will that be enough in the long run?


RR


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2006 12:08 pm 
Hi RR

"Floundering about". That absolutely sums it up - wish I could have expressed the way I feel about the educational system as suucinctly as you have just done.

The report you posted made very interesting reading. Yes boys can flourish without male teachers/role models. Interesting that they emphasise that responsive marking is extremely important ( I think we came to that conclusion between us) and well-maintained home-school reading diaries were seen to be important. Thats something my sons current teacher has set up with an expectation that they read at least 5 times a week for a minimum of 30 minutes, with 3 of those sessions involving reading to an adult. Stickers and house points are awarded for success in achieving this.

What scares me is the fact that that this report has been around for 3 years and this is the first primary teacher I have come across that seems to be even remotely following the recommendations. I'm confused as to why my children are taught by people who either do not read about or do not care about recommended best practice.

What worries me even more is your point about parental support. Yes I can do it at primary level but what about further down the line. I guess thats the point that I hope my children become far more self directed in the persuit of knowledge!!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2006 10:29 pm 
guest65 wrote:
I really feel for your son. All that effort and no positive comment. Have these teachers never heard of 'emotional intelligence'. My second (very bright) son is now in year 5. He has previously spent 5 years drifting at school because he is in the top groups and bored out of his brain because he feels he has been 'taught' absolutely nothing until this year. He now has a teacher who recognises him as an individual, sets tasks according to his ability and comments constructively on all his homework tasks to help him improve. She is the first teacher to do this since he started at primary school. Consequently he is putting in far more effort, enjoys school, says positive things about his teacher for the first time ever and comes out with a smile on his face every day. He is also getting top grades for his effort (and boy does he want to please her).

Very much a case of previously not 'rising above indiferent teaching' as Catherine quoted from the document. My experience would suggest its not the boys that are the problem but the system (more accurately the teaching staff - especially at primary school) who seem to be failing them. My son is at a school where every member of staff is female. I do wonder if more male role models would be beneficial.

Any comments from those with male teachers?


It's the system that's to blame. I have a son in year 6 who has spent all his time in primary school in top groups and bored out of his brain. He can't wait to get to grammar school as he's sure it's the only way he'll ever achieve anything in education. I commend his attitude and hope he does well enough on the test! (His primary school doesn't help with 11+, so I am tutoring him myself with the help of this website and Bond/NFER etc.).

By the way - he did have a male teacher in year 5 and although he said he didn't really like him, he admits, looking back, he was actually quite good compared to the teacher he has now (female). His favourite teacher so far was his Year 1 teacher - an Australian.

It does seem that teachers can't appreciate a child's individuality. His current teacher told me at parents evening recently that he needs to take school more seriously. Another case of 'not rising above indifferent teaching'?
:roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2006 11:43 am 
Catherine,

Just wondering, if the 11+ intake at a mixed grammer reflects the gender gap. I think SGS is mixed, do you know what percentage were girls and boys this year or do they intake 50/50 each year?

In my son's (primary) English set, there are 8 boys and 22 girls, Maths is 12 boys, 18 girls. Both are top sets. This does appear somewhat to reflect stats.

BW


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2006 3:20 pm 
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Location: Berks,Bucks
Hi BW,

Mixed grammars do not use gender as a selection criteria, so there must be a variable ratio of boys/girls.
It would be interesting to find out if there is general trend, but haven't got any info on this.

Catherine


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