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 Post subject: Chemisty& Physics
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 11:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:32 pm
Posts: 410
My son has started Grammar school this year and is now exposed to the above and he tells me he is 'just not getting it'. I am not too worried as I know it is early days and these subjects are new to him but I think he is worrying about it so if anyone knows of any books or other ways to help him I would appreciate it.

Thanks
MelX


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:26 am 
If you investigate the BBC website, you will find lots of information. This Revision guide summarises information which may help to make sense of things.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/

I like Dorling Kindersley books for background reading on specific topics. I can be expensive to buy a lot of these, so get them from your local library. We have bought a few though as they are such nice colourful books to look at, as well as containing lots of information.

Other things to do. Go to toy store and get Chemistry set. We have one at home which contains most of the common experiments which they start off doing. Things like trying to dissolve salt, sugar and flour in water. Perhaps, your son doesn't understand why he's doing this? Thinks that the answers are obvious? Well, of course they are, we have all been doing Chemistry from a very early age. What he is learning now, is how to experiment with a scientific mind and how to record what he has done and his results in a scientific way, so that someone else could follow his instructions and repeat his results. He is NOT learning that salt dissolves more quickly in warm water, as he already knows that.

In Physics as well, he will be being told things he already knows. What he is being taught, is how to look at these things in a scientific way, and how to recognise patterns and rules. How to think about what might be causing things to happen. Find the story of Isaac Newton and the apple for him!

The problem today, is that so much Science teaching is being done by non-specialists. Hopefully, at a Grammar School this is not the case. Watch out for this though, as sometimes the teachers have got the wrong end of the stick, and that is why the pupils are confused about why they are doing things.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2006 10:02 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 10:05 am
Posts: 445
Location: LONDON
Hi MelX

I think jah has made an interesting point. Have you explored what it is he is not 'getting'. Does he just not understand it, is it too simple, is the techer a problem, do all the other kids seem much brighter........ etc etc. If you haven't explored fully you probably won't be able to come up with a strategy to help him. If you have delved into the problem and know exactly what the issue is why don't you repost as I'm sure someone can help you.

By the way jah I also think the KS3 science section of the BBC website is invaluable. It examines alot of the concepts that they are expected to know and makes them look 'easy'.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:35 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
Hi Mel X,

My son is using the CGP workbooks and revision guide for homework. The revision book provides a concise way of presenting the information, and is a good reference for the workbooks questions. (4 books about £4.50 each).


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