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 Post subject: Exam revision
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 1:24 pm 
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Just wondered whether anyone had any views on revising for exams in Year 7-9. They have exams but don't appear to be given any guidance on how to revise. I don't want to interfere but do feel dc would benefit from some sort of timetable to structure revision rather than panic revision the night before - often for 3 subjects.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 2:11 pm 
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I would contact the Head of Year to ask for guidance - staff should have given children some advice on revision/format of exams etc.

In the absence of anything from the school I would focus on developing good revision skills for the future rather than a rush job to get through the exam.

Depending on how long you have before the exams I would say at least half a day of revision per subject as a minimum.

It sounds like the exams are all together in a short period so try to avoid revision during the exam period except for looking over revision notes of specifics that DC needs to have in front of mind (formula/French verb they struggle with/few critical History dates etc)

My feeling with Year 7 exams is to provide general guidance & then as much as help as DC wants but to some extent to let them learn from the experience - if they think they can 'wing it' then Year 7 exams are probably the best ones for them to 'learn the error of their ways' :)


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:47 pm 
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Unfortunately, not all teachers offer guidance on how to revise. I guess they assume that the knowledge is already there.

During an OFSTED inspection by the local LEA (how did they manage that!) I was asked what I'd meant when I'd asked the pupils to 'learn' something. I struggled to answer the question and no further explanation followed. A few years later, working with the same team on MFL teaching, an explanation for the question was offered. The word 'learn' means different things in different situations - I could've been asking pupils to memorise the meaning of a group of words, or I could've meant learn the French spelling and not the meaning, or I could've been expecting them to learn both the meaning and the spelling. So obvious to me and maybe to a third of the class, but not to everyone. I had never considered the possibility of the word 'learn' having a multitude of meanings. If one small word can cause confusion ...


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 7:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 12:06 pm
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Location: Rugby
I was never taught how to revise until I was in 6th Form. Where the Head of 6th Form actually taught students how to learn. It revolutionised my life and education because I learnt that it was MY EDUCATION and I WAS IN CHARGE of LEARNING. Actually, the teacher was largely irrelevant. The teacher taught, but it was up to me if I wanted to learn.

I take great pains to pass on the tricks of the trade to my students.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:34 am 
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n kent mum -

http://crgsonline.crgs.co.uk/dept/revision/

This is designed for parents of year 7-9 pupils at DC's school but since they are all studying the NC(?) it might help if you can't get anything from your own school.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 12:06 pm
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Location: Rugby
Try www.chalkface.net

It has some useful stuff and many many links to other sites. It does take some ploughing through but may turn up some useful websites.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:49 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
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Location: Rugby
A little and often every day.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:07 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2008 1:25 pm
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Sassie'sDad wrote:
A little and often every day.

please move in and tell my son this!
it is so frustrating, although very Ouspensky, to witness him continuing to make the same mistakes; not to learn from last year's not ideal exam results. I have endeavoured to tell him to read through his notes each day in an attempt to screw the knowledge learnt into his head a little as he goes. Does he? Nope. Utterly maddening.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 6:29 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:47 am
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Location: Warwickshire.
Exactly the same at this house Milla!!
Thankfully, my daughter will be totally different (Unless she becomes Kevina the teenager). :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:40 pm
Posts: 966
Thank you all for your kind replies. I am trying to persuade on a little and often. I keep reminding that all revision cannot be done in a day. But ultimately I suppose it is their choice. Hard - but I cannot make dc revise.


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