Go to navigation
It is currently Sun Dec 04, 2016 3:52 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 7:28 pm
Posts: 950
Location: Bucks
My son has to hand in his gcse option form by this Friday and I just want to make sure all choices are the right ones and every angle is covered.

I find it quite sad that if they don't get an A* or A, then it seems they are ruled out in future for university courses they want where a B just wouldn't cut it.

What do you look for?
What previous years stats do you look at? What percentages and entrance numbers are you looking at? What do you perceive stats wise to be a good indicator of a subject well taught?

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4604
The problem is that there will be good and not-so-good teachers in all departments - you won't know which teacher your child will get. Also you don't know if your child will take a dislike to the teacher. I would say look at previous results but go with what your son enjoys.

A "B" at A level doesn't necessarily rule out something at degree level (is this what you mean?). It might rule out a top uni, but not everyone can go there anyway!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 7:28 pm
Posts: 950
Location: Bucks
Yes, is what I mean. I'm looking at some of there subject breakdown percentages, but what percentage would be considered good, bad I have no idea!

I know a lot can also depend on teachers and the child's willingness to out the effort in but I'm trying to look at all factors as to whether a subject is the right choice for him to take and the only other thing I have to go by would be the stats on how they've performed over the past two years.
I'm particularly meaning Ancient History in my sons case.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 4:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
How many teachers teach it at his school?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 4:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 7:28 pm
Posts: 950
Location: Bucks
Ooh, good question and I don't know. Looking through the contacts list there are 5 classics teachers, but whether or not they would all cover ancient history I don't know.

From results I've received, 25 sat it in 2012 and 12 sat it in 2011.


Edited to say: very quick response from Head of Upper school to say that two teachers cover this specific subject and both my DS is fond of and works well for, feel good now, thanks Mystery :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 4:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
I once spotted something online where you could see grade by grade subjects nationally for each subject. You could then compare the school's grade by grade results with the national results grade by grade. At either extreme it would tell you something - either that it was much better or much worse than average in those years. But it wouldn't guarantee for you what would happen this year - say if the teacher changes.

However, I do think that once a child gets to GCSE the teaching is a little less important - clearly if it's rubbish it's a big hindrance. The syllabuses are well spelt out, and the revision guides and past questions from the exam boards are very clear. You can pretty much DIY it and beat the school track record if you are keen and interested in the subject. Of course, it's a shame if the lessons are a complete waste of time. I think a teacher would have difficulties objecting to someone reading the revision guide under the desk while they waffled on about yesterday's football though. So even rubbish lessons could be productive.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 5:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 7:28 pm
Posts: 950
Location: Bucks
That's exactly the type of thing I have been searching for endless.y but I cannot for the life of me find it :(

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 5:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11934
Quote:
I think a teacher would have difficulties objecting to someone reading the revision guide under the desk while they waffled on about yesterday's football though.


Mystery - I cannot believe you posted this! As if any teacher would 'waffle on' ... I would not be impressed if any pupil read a revision guide in one of my lessons! They would be missing on on new stuff ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
:lol: I'm sure your classes are impeccable Guest55, but there were lessons like that at my school - and certainly I hear of similar from close teenage relatives!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
I can't find anything where ancient history is split out from history or classics. Maybe ask the relevant exam board? FOI it from them if necessary?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016