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 Post subject: Children travel alone
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 1:16 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 1:19 pm
Posts: 30
Hi
14 year old travelling with 7 year old on their own
Just want to know whether my 14 year old boy can take my 7year old boy to park, picking up from schools, travel in bus especially , not long distance just to town centre on their own. is there any rule regarding this?
can both them can do cycling in a quiet place /pavement near park on their own?
Please give your ideas as early as possible I have to plan something tomorrow/week end
Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 1:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
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There is no law about babysitting age! Or the ge at which children can be left, but you would be legally responsible & if anything happened you could be charged with neglect, so it is your decision based on knowing both the children.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:06 pm 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12380329

I found this article. It explains the 'rules' governing teenage babysitters.

My eldest turns 14 later this year and I have an almost-11 year old. At present, I only leave them together for very short periods of time at home, although will allow them to got to the local shops, down to friends etc. I would feel unhappy leaving them both at home for several hours.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:59 pm 
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I'd be quite happy for a 14 year old to look after a 7 year old - assuming that you are happy with your own children doing this, and are asking about how it would look from outside.

The NSPCC are often scaremongers, imo, and I think their suggestions are quite insulting to most 15 year olds tbh! I would urge anyone who got into any trouble about this to reread what Ms Gilliatt, the lawyer, says in the article - accepting a caution is an admission of guilt. I'd be quite happy to let the police try to take a case to court if it were me.


Last edited by aliportico on Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:27 pm 
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From Year 7 many students have to travel to secondary school on their own. I am sure many of us on this forum have DC who have to do just that. With a 7 year old in tow? Of course. Why not?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:55 pm 
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Location: Essex
Wary as I usually am of making such comments, but I can't help wondering, do Thames Valley Police have too much time on their hands?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Yes it would seem like it, unless there was something clearly odd about that particular 14 year old. I wouldn't like to leave someone in charge of a child who wouldn't do the right thing in an emergency, but many adults wouldn't.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:04 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:07 pm
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I leave my 14 yr old to look after a 7 yr old sometimes, when the older siblings aren't around. Although generally a pain like most teenage boys he is excellent when left in charge. I have no problem with him taking and collecting from school etc. I might not let them go on a bike ride outside the garden due to the traffic.

My sister used to be in charge of me travelling to boarding school on a train, several hundred miles from home. We were put on by our parents and collected by our grandparents and frequently had to change trains during the journey. She was 12 and I was 8.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:05 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:14 am
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I actually find this quite a difficult one, despite being one of those who babysat at around 10 for two toddlers which was the norm in those days... :roll:
I have a very responsible soon to be 14 year old and a 7 year old and still spend time finding babysitters who may be only a couple of years older and arguably less responsible than DS! I frequently leave instructions with the babysitters to ask DS if they need any help....
I hadn't even considered the idea of them going out of the house together, without me. :lol:
On one occasion I did leave them together having put DD to bed and made sure that she was asleep first. I'm not really sure what would hold me back when he is 14, but nevertheless I do feel concerned, not through any doubts about the kids' abilities to cope with the situation, but more lest an 'outsider' looked in.... :oops:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 11:02 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 1:19 pm
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Thanks for all answers.
As the rule in this country remains like this nobody is going to learn responsibilities even if they become mums/dads . That is why so many babies die when they are under their own parents care.
Children should be taught how to take care of others when at their young age . Accidents can happen at any time , anywhere and in anybody’s hands. Even this accidents can happen if we left child with child care people who makes the law or with the police who warns others.
No parents leave their children alone if they are not responsible and we can’t guarantee that no accidents /incidents will happen when they left their responsible children alone.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12380329
Start Quote from the bbc ..
Child development specialist and author of Toxic Childhood Sue Palmer argues that parents, as well as too much legislation in the UK, are part of the problem.
"Children are becoming less competent because they are being treated like carefully protected pets.
"Unless you let them take on chores and take responsibility for their own behaviour and learn to deal with real time, space and people, you won't be able to leave them in charge of another child."
"We are almost legislating ourselves into a world built on accountability procedures and bureaucracy and statistics, and that's a very unpleasant world."
And this is, she says, fast making the UK a laughing stock among its European neighbours, where a 14-year-old in charge of a three-year-old is considered normal behaviour.
Because of this law and caution no parents dare to leave even their responsible children alone . The quote is absolutely right !! :shock:


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