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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 12:00 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 9:15 pm
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Location: Kent
Any suggestions of book titles that may get a reluctant reader's interest back? Or any other advice that may help.

I think the problem is one of confidence, she is an able reader with good comprehension skills but has some dyslexic tendancies. Her new school gave the girls a suggested reading list but she has been unable to find anything on it that suited her and I think she is hung up with tying to asses whether the book is of a high enough standard or not. She says she prefers short stories and likes a book with humour. Her particular interests are horses and animals. I would prefer her to be reading anything than nothing (if that makes sense).

I think an additional concern to her may be that her younger brother who is an avid reader anyway is being encouraged to read at school by being given raffle tickets for every time he reads so he is reading three books at any given time to attain 3 tickets a day (which I don't particularly agree with but he is following the books properly if his discussions are anything to go by). His three at the moment are; Harry Potter(4th), Famous Five and Just William and she made comments about him turning into a book and a few others that led me to believe she was comparing herself unfairly.

We have explained that it is not a competition, reading is something you should be able to enjoy for yourself and that the suggested reading list is just that...suggestions but I can see she is troubled and would like to be able to find a way to help her.

A mum


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 1:50 pm 
Our 12-year old daughter also prefers her books with humour or human interest (or animal interest, come to that). Doesn't really go for the fantasy worlds that so many of the authors depict (Rowling, Pratchett, Pullman).

She used to really like Jacquline Wilson, although trying to wean her off a bit now! Recently she has enjoyed The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Chinese Cinderella, The Little Princess and Warhorse (Murpego) - also on currently at the National (wonderful production). The latter could be a good match for your daughter? I think the key is for her develop her own tastes that she feels are independent of her brother's.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

Geoffrey


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 2:02 pm 
Have you tried borrowing books from the library that are non fiction but on animals. (science type books or encycopedia/information books).

My younger child used to pore over these a lot and I used to worry that he would not fare well in creative writing as he did not seem to have a more varied taste in books.

However, his writing was full of imaginative plots(involving animals ,I have to say) and his descriptions were so apt e.g. when describing an eagle soaring, it's wings and body, eyes etc and how it must be feeling.

In time he has grown to read different types of books (fantasy as well as adventure) even though he wasn't keen on them when I first introduced them to him.

The fact that she prefers shorter stories may mean that she finds the longer books too much of a chore. Have you got time to read with her? It's quite a nice thing to still share a book even if you are older. Cuddle up and take turns reading to each other.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:15 pm 
We bought a boxed set of all the James Herriot books (about 10 of them) for a very good price from The Book People (I don't think it's on their current list but may come up again). My 10 year old, who had also gone off reading a bit, wolfed the whole series down. They combine animals and humour rather well I think.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:21 pm 
By the way, in case you are unfamiliar with James Herriot's books, each chapter is effectively a story in its own right so you can take it very slowly if you want. But they are "proper" books written primarily for adults.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:25 pm 
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My dd loves Hilary McKay. Have you thought about giving your daughter raffle tickets like her brother? Run your own scheme!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:59 pm 
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This old thread may be of some use....

viewtopic.php?t=986

Patricia


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:41 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2007 9:25 am
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try Channel 4 lost for words site. There's a lot of information as well as an interesting "book choosing" interactive tab for children. (They won't be able to resist).

Do go and ask for advice from your nearest "children's librarian" -and check out "Book Trust"'s site for the latest releases.

There's also a site called "National Literacy Trust" - which offers information via links. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 9:57 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 9:15 pm
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Location: Kent
Thank you all for your replies which were much appreciated.

She used to read alot more it has just been since starting senior school that the problem has developed and some of that can be put down to time constraints and being more tired, but she feels she should be reading more and 'better' books.

We do go to the Library regularly and will be looking out for Hichhikers Guide, Chinese cinderella and the Little Princess (I have only heard of the first one). She has read most of Jacqueline Wilson and a lot of Micheal Murpogo. I will be looking out for Hilary McKay too but I have a funny feeling that she has already tried these. I love the James Herriot books and think I might give that ago as I think she will like the idea that these are adult books that she has seen me read which in itself might be an incentive enough.

We will also take a look at the Web sites and hopefully pick up some more suggestions there.

Running our own 'raffle' scheme at home will not work as she will flatly refuse to do anything in line with her brother and I think it will cause too much emphasis being placed on this. I can see this would work for others though and if the problem was with my son this would be a great idea, but they are very different children(and who would have it any other way) .

I am hoping this is just a temporary thing and we happen across a book that turns the tables soon.

Thanks again for all your help

A Mum


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:28 am 
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My dd is actually enjoying regressing a bit in her reading - she is happily working her way through the Mallory Towers books, having read the St Clares ones when she was in year 5. She looks forward to going to bed and switching her brain off for 30 minutes before sleep. Year 7 is hard work!


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