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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 pm
Posts: 923
Dd2 has lately said she might be interested in Engineering as a career possibility. She is good at science and does ok in maths at HBS (ie is doing great at maths but she just doesn't know it as others are even better). She is going intô year 9 and thinking about GCSEs - as well as extra maths and science, might D&T be a good option to consider? What else?

She doesn't really have a focussed interest but is quite an all rounder, and will work hard as needed to get to her goal. She wants to earn a good living as well.

I guess being female isn't that much if a problem anymore, with "male" careers.

How can I help her find out about where engineering might lead? Any other tips? It's kind of outside my comforts zone!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11931
http://www.wherestemcantakeyou.co.uk/

https://www.wisecampaign.org.uk/

http://www.futuremorph.org/14-16/

There are many types of engineering so she needs to think which 'sort' she might like. University courses tend to be more industry related at non-RG universities. CAD is increasingly important

Maths and Physics are key A levels - some unis like Chemistry, others prefer D&T - I'd certainly take GCSE Technology.

I think, these days, that being female might actually be an advantage in this career ....


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 2:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:58 pm
Posts: 496
My DD has done courses with

http://www.smallpeicetrust.org.uk/

She did a fantastic 5 day residential course for free at RAF Wittering which focused on the engineering and logistics involved in a humanitarian aid project or natural disaster. She got another Crest Silver award during the week long course.

She also spent two weeks last summer in the Outbox Incubator house (running again next summer).

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anne-rava ... 49122.html

She tends to find out about all these STEM opportunities through

http://www.britishscienceassociation.org/crest-awards

(Interestingly, after doing so much engineering she is no longer interested in it as a career).


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 3:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4019
Location: Reading
I'm a chemical engineer. whynotchemeng is another good site.

Some engineering disciplines have a higher female % than others. Chem eng seems the highest, but it's not really an issue either way.

A levels in maths and physics essential. Chemistry essential for Chem eng (though in theory you would get away without physics for some Chem eng courses I wouldn't recommend not doing it.) Biology is useful for biochem eng. further maths is also well received and well worth doing tbh.

Engineering is very varied and you definitely wouldn't be restricted to engineering careers afterwards either.
My career has been very varied (not planned that way). I'd also say that doing one type of engineering doesn't necessarily restrict you from moving into other areas of engineering either. (I've done that a bit too).

Pay wise engineers do quite well these days.
Feel free to Pm me if you have questions.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 3:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:44 am
Posts: 1390
Location: Reading
I started off doing engineering at uni (although I changed courses in the end). I did technical drawing O level at an evening class since my traditional girls school didn't offer such subjects - I found this useful. I chose a course with a 'general' first year before you had to choose between electrical/mechanical. At the time, on my course, there were 56 male and 4 female but I don't think that made and difference for either gender.
Maths and Physics were essential


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 5:25 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4019
Location: Reading
As far as courses go, I'd definitely recommend doing a masters. (MEng). To get chartered engineer status you need to have a masters or jump through a few additional hoops instead. I'm not sure what that entails, as I did a MEng and it was before you needed to have one.
I'd also strongly recommend a course with some industrial experience or at least try and get some summer work experience.

Alternatively, there are some very good apprenticeship schemes put there for engineering, some leading to degrees. Changes to the apprenticeship system mean that some companies may be looking to take on students in their last year of a degree as part of their apprenticeship scheme too.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 6:42 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 2352
Product Design GCSE was a good introduction to many of the skills required for mechanical engineering degrees.

Definitely get involved in any practical projects being offered through school as well. There are often national competitions to design and make things to a specification.

Look into Arkwright scholarships if she is keen.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 pm
Posts: 923
Thank you all. what :D would I do without this forum?


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:25 am 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4019
Location: Reading
Does the school do first Lego league? It's probably a bit late to register this year if they don't but it's a great competition.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:34 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:01 pm
Posts: 57
Blitz - thrilled to hear your daughter was at the Outbox Incubator! How did she get along? Without outing myself, I was a little bit connected to it and they looked to be loving it.

Tinkers - please also remember that technology (coding and related jobs) is an amazing career for females. They tend to be very successful, being able to merge maths with soft skills, and it's a great career for flexibility when that is needed.


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