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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:41 pm
Posts: 60
Can anyone shed any light on what happens to all the children who pass the 11+ by the time they are 15?
In year 7 they all turn up at Grammar school helped by their devoted and caring parents, suitably dressed in the correct uniform, drug and alcohol free with no piercings, hair dye or other chav affectations, speaking the queens english without any swear words. BUT by year 10 all of this entirely laudable behaviour has ceased. Is it the parents fault or the schools fault or other peoples childrens fault?
What happens to them that even in a grammar school a significant minority turn into chavs in such a short space of time?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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Not in my experience - name and shame the school!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:49 am
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Location: London
You are hilarious magwich :lol: It's called puberty and that bl**dy magazine called More! :roll:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:08 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
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How long is a piece of string?

There are good and bad parents, there are good and bad shools, there are good and bad teachers, dare I say different types of children.

I have said on many occasions the word 'Grammar' does not mean good behaviour.

Children going up to 'big' school suddenly have a sense of freedom, the majority arriving to school by bus, or being dropped off outside the school gates [no more mums congregating on the playground, chatting in order to save the world] Major groups are formed, from different walks of life, no parental eyes watching them to tell them how to behave.

Good and bad teachers, of course there are bad teachers and yes some are in our grammars and independents and comprehensives. My worst kind of teacher, those who cannot control a class of 6 foot year 10 boys or a class of year10 girls, who have the look of young women but the minds of a teenager. Those teachers that threaten discipline but never carry it through, my goodness those teens will take well and truly advantage of the situation. Lets get the deputy in or a senior teacher and of course the teens are sweetness and light, they KNOW who they need to respect and those they just ignore. As adults we KNOW how to react to people depending on their personalities, so do our children.

Of course the majority of teachers are dedicated but there ARE a number who should not be in the profession [and yes they are in your grammars and independents. ] Not one school is perfect.

As parents we need to keep control, without our darlings knowing it, my dad used to call it Kidology. Get to know their friends, they will be from different backgrounds/wealth status/land area. Invite them round [dreaded sleepovers, I loved them really] Become a taxi, do not sit there like a lemon just because a teen is scared you might embarrass them. Talk to them, listen to them. I am very proud to say [yes I am boasting] I have a very good relationship with my teens and their friends, they all know me as the mad Tutor who plays Deep Purple and Il Divo, they all treat me respect, they even acknowledge me while out shopping and even queing for Reading Festival, [thats them attending not me]

You will more than likely not get to know the parents of your childrens friends as much as those from your junior schools. Get involved in the school [PTA, any social events, governors] get to know the school, parents and teachers, keep your ear to the ground.

So yes some of our children will get in with the wrong crowd, many will swear [not in front of you though] some will have non effective teachers, some will have parents that have not kept in touch with what is actually going on in their childrens lives. The answer to that ? How long was that piece of string?

As parents we must get involved [without them knowing or realising]

Patricia


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:41 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:29 pm
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Location: Berkshire
I've always put it down to; a heaving, melting pot of hormonal teenagers. Testing their legs, pushing the boundaries, trying out that little bit of extra freedom, away from their parental watchful eyes. That age and phase that we all have to go through to eventually emerge into society as sensible, well rounded individuals. :wink:

I do like your approach, though, Patricia. Thank you, shall happily put that into practise, when my one starts in September. (his current friends already think, I'm half crazy! ) :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 1:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2008 2:31 pm
Posts: 66
I have offered my daughter the chance to have her ears pierced now that she has stopped wearing uniform, but she's said No thanks!! She doesn't swear, would never smoke, just drinks a little champagne at family functions, and wears clothes her granny approves of.

A paragon? May be.. We still have the shouting matches, the untidy bedroom, the lack of organisation - so perhaps she is a normal teenager after all. :D

It's a question of sticking to the boundaries when they do matter, and going with the flow when it doesn't.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 9:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2007 10:03 am
Posts: 54
wow have just discovered this section of boards! and the first thread I happen to read is about my son !

Having spent an hour on the phone this morning to his form tutor(he phoned me) I am none the wiser !

My son seems to have turned into a normal teenager by all accounts......strange hair, piercing (retainer used for school of course!) attitude from ****...............all accounts except for his form tutor......apparently they have never experienced such things as teenagers at grammar school :-).....his behaviour is a surprise to them...........


so.............

can all you parents who have children in Grammar school above year 9 where my son currently is.......please tell me how you prevented the onset of kevin-itis..........it seems I am THE worst parent ever as the school have never had teenagers with attitude before I blessed them with my little darling!


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