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 Post subject: Careers at 13???
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:06 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:32 pm
Posts: 410
Hello there

When at nans this weekend DS was asked what he wants to do when he grows up and well he answered that he doesn't know which I thought was fine. Why should he? he is only 13. However Nan felt he should have an idea by now. Anyway with all due respect to Mother-in-law(who I love dearly)the fact he couldn't tell her didn't concern dh or I but it did get me thinking. When do they know???. I mean yes in the past he had wanted to be a Lawyer or Barrister as loves the way they act in court and would like to wear a wig. He also loves sport so would like to be a Reporter and does also fancy himself as the next 'Jonathan Ross'(god forbid!!) however neither we or he has ever discussed it very seriously. Is that wrong??

Also just the other day he brought home a letter about a careers fair happening at his school for years 9, 10 & 11.

So I am thinking I should take him. Although I don't want to put pressure on him to make such big choices so early.

So guys my question to you all is what is your experience(if you have older children) or if like me you haven't really considered your childs career that much are you concerned, do they themseleves have ideas??

At 13, 14 even 15 in this day and age should they be deciding this early on???


Mel
:?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:12 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8117
no, they probably won't havea clue at that age and even those who do often end up doing something else.
Lots of people I was at school with ended up doing things unrelated to their first degree and jobs they would never have previously considered, school we were at was keen on Gen studies A level and HUGE numbers did maths A level as both were helpful if a career change was planned (moral - stay flexible re options)
I reckon one of the problems of deciding definitely on a career is that you close doors to lots of interesting careers.
DS has to do work experience - he knows what he wants to do careers wise but frankly I think they are better fiding out what other people do in their jobs as this broadens the experience they have of other people. One lad I heard of worked with an estate agent for a week - he has no intention of doing th job but learnt a huge amount about people.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:17 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 10:30 am
Posts: 505
Location: Warwickshire
I was still trying to work it out in my last year at university... I just kept my options open by studying lots of stuff that I found interesting!

It's possibly even more difficult now since our youngsters are likely to switch round lots of 'careers' in their working lifetime, so the broader their interests at school, the better.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:19 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
My daughter who is 20 still has no idea what she wants to do after uni.

I left school at 17 because i was didn;t want to be a teacher.....34 years on here I am teaching!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:49 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:57 pm
Posts: 1167
Mine haven't got a clue - except the youngest who would like to work with animals!
The eldest has picked A levels in subjects that she likes and is quite good at. If she chooses to go to university then I think she will again be influenced by what subject(s) she enjoys.

Careers... there's no need to decide so early - I think it positively dangerous to steer any child in one direction only at such a young age.

If they are unsure themselves what they would like to do as a career then encourage a diverse range of subjects for GCSE and let them pick their own A levels/college course based on what they enjoy most. Advise accordingly... :wink: but let it be their decision.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 9:59 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
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yoyo123 wrote:
I left school at 17 because i was didn;t want to be a teacher.....34 years on here I am teaching!


LOL YoYo123 - how lots of us ended up doing what we are doing!!!!!!


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 Post subject: careers
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:10 am 
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Joined: Wed May 09, 2007 2:09 pm
Posts: 875
Location: Solihull, West Midlands
There's no harm in going to the careers fair (even if only to race around with his friends to pick up the carrier bags and freebies) which if he in in Year 9 will be part of the process of considering GCSE options. He is unlikely to come home with a burning desire to be a quantity surveyor or one of the other random careers which these events tend to attract in my experience, but it can't hurt to start thinking about what sorts of things might be interesting and to ensure that he doesn't at this stage close off any options too early (although that would tend to be more by A Level choice than GCSE as maths, science, english tend to be standard..). There may also be some colleges with stalls offering their range of A Level options as well as possibly the local doctor/ vet/ estate agent etc, possibly one of the Forces, hopefully an Engineering stand, maybe architecture, hairdressing (well my DC have all been at a comp and this is the kind of mixture I've seen at these events). Some rare children do have a firm idea of the career they want to follow very early but most don't - my Yr 10 DD so far wants to do "something with science, or animals, but not a vet..)", I have an older son who's just started a Maths degree and has no idea what he'll do with it (mind you, I still have very little idea what I'm doing with mine...) and the eldest is halfway through an Engineeering degree and is starting to find out now what aspects are really interesting.

Hope this helps


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:13 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:49 pm
Posts: 1647
Location: berkshire
I think it is a good idea to be aware how choices you make in GCSE's can affect your future career. I know I would have encouraged my ds to continue with a language (if it wasn't compulsory) even though he struggles slightly.
I would have thought most children should be able to continue with the subjects that they enjoy, interest them and they show an aptitude for. The more flexibilty and wider choice.... the better.

Robotics and Cybernetics is the current thinking in my household......although presenting Top Gear is high on the wishlist.


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 Post subject: Mel x
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 11:42 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:32 pm
Posts: 410
Thank you everyone

I was actually worried that everyone would have some idea so I am very assured now. As suggested I will take him along to the fair as I guess it won't hurt but as so many of you suggest I will allow him to contuniue being a child/teenager and shall ensure he knows to we will go to the career fair just for the freebies

Mind you I am currently looking a career change myself so could be useful

Thanks again.

Mel
x


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 6:55 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:47 am
Posts: 3310
Location: Warwickshire.
My daughter - aged only (nearly) ten - THINKS she already knows her future career...
She has researched the universities which offer vetinary science and already discovered that to get into one of them she would need horse riding experience!!
Do I think she will ever actually become a vet? Not necessarily. Saying that, I always wanted to be a teacher (unlike Yoyo!!). However, she loves knowing that she thinks she knows what she wants to be (what a convoluted sentence) and loves to watch programmes about animals etc etc.
I certainly would not expect her to know for definite at 13 though. Maybe the careers fayre is more about showing the children the myriad possibilities though, as opposed to encouraging them to choose??


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