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 Post subject: KS 3 workbooks
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 10:13 am
Posts: 32
I was wondering if anyone has bought some KS3 books recently. I am thinking of investing in a few Maths, English and Science books.
Its been a while since I purchased any subject specific items as the last ones were the CGP KS2 books.
My dear boys are receiving alot of homework for Maths topics before they have been taught!! Apparently the teachers want to see what they know.

Any advice would be most welcome.
Thanks
Twins mum :lol: :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: caversham
Hi Twins mum,

I have invested in CGP KS3 books and for maths, chemistry, biology and physics the GCSE books as they extend some of the topics. :)

Some of the school text books seem a bit old fashioned and not very user friendly. So a second explanation often helps me.

steve


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 7:29 pm 
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I would go for a good textbook e.g. Oxford Framework Maths E (extension) or use website - they're free and very good! Does the school subscribe to MyMaths?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 7:40 pm 
I hope you don't mind me saying this but if the teacher is trying to ascertain what a pupil already knows then buying these books to teach them won't give her an idea of what they've been previously taught. In fact if you teach them some subjects she may think they know it and then not go over it in school which may mean they do not have a firm foundation in these topics.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:24 pm 
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Tipsy you are right :lol:

However - I would not use homework to find out what they know - it's for the 'starter' when I can assess their prior knowledge.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:28 pm 
Guest55 you are right too! :D

Its better to do this in a class environment where a teacher can get the most acurate info because it come solely from the child.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 10:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 10:13 am
Posts: 32
Thank you all for your help and advice on this one.

I think the text books will reinforce what they are being taught in school. Also its always a good idea to have something to refer to if they get stuck on a particular topic.

Their school has subscribed to Mymaths and the boys really enjoy completing homework in this manner. They seem to be doing very well in all their subjects for the minute apart from Maths.

Apparently the Maths teacher told one of the children "Are you sure you are in the right school" and "I am beginning to think whether you should be here". After speaking with a number of parents from other years this is a continuing problem. I have not made a big deal of it at the moment and am encouraging and building confidence in my son in this subject.

Thanks
Twins mum :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 10:53 am 
I can't believe the teacher said that :shock: - disgraceful! :x

Although this may be a product of coached kids who don't actually have natural ability. :? (not talking about your kiddies Twins mum :) )


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 11:14 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:18 pm
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Location: kent
Alternatively it could have been a sarcastic comment from a teacher who thought that a child was not trying - i.e. intelligent enough for GS, but slacking - and thought that this kind of comment might get that particular child to pull his/ her socks up. Comments from teachers quoted out of context can be very misleading.

It's the kind of comment that would work for some children (e.g. my contrary pre-schooler who would wish to prove the teacher wrong) but backfire miserably on the wrong child.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 11:44 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 10:13 am
Posts: 32
I understand that children can sometimes exaggerate the issue.

At least my son is so scared to make a mistake that he really applies himself in the class and at home. Having said that he is so scared that he probably will never approach the teacher. He also never passes any good comments to encourage the child which I feel is very odd.

At the moment I am not worried as he completes homework in a quick and efficient manner even if he does make a few mistakes - Boys for you!!

I feel these are the years they are supposed to enjoy their learning and experiences at school.


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