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 Post subject: NVR sequences
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 10:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 439
My DS finds the NVR sequences difficult so my DH has decided this evening to go through the Nfer NVR papers to try and identify characteristics of the sequences that my DS could work through if he is finding a particular question difficult. However DH has already run into difficulties because looking at particular questions he and I can already see different answers to questions each of which is equally compelling!

For example: NVR11B section 3 question 5 :

The answer given is b.

However there are a number of different analyses of this sequence:

In all cases the size of the shape ocillates

i) [ this is mine!] Group the sequence in pairs. Then reflect the first of each pair about its short axis to get the second of each pair. Then reduce the size of the shape. To get the first shape of the next pair then rotate clockwise by 90 degrees and expand size and so on. Answer = b.

ii) [this is DH]. Starting with the first element rotate clockwise successively by 360, 270, 180, 90 degrees, alternating the size of the shape. Answer = d

iii) [ this is DH]. Rotate alternately by 180 degrees and 90 degrees clockwise between elements, alternating the size. Answer = b.

How can one decide which is the best analysis??

Has anyone complied a list of NVR sequence characteristics that they would be happy to share? And which takes priority?


thanks

Twinkle


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:46 am 
I think your 1st and 3rd explanations are a different way of saying pretty much the same thing. I think the 2nd one somewhat on the obscure side and I certainly wouldn't encourage child to look too deeply for possible alternatives or to express them in too complicated terms.

I always get pupils to take one aspect at a time and do a sweep through, eliminating the wrong rather than selecting the right. By aspects I mean colour, size, position, number etc.

So, with the one you have quoted, I would go right to left (the space being near the left hand side). I'd go large, small, large, therefore small, thereby stroking out a and b. Then I'd quickly say turn right, flip, turn right, flip, leaving you with just b. I would keep the language terms simple, too.

I certainly wouldn't have them look at the whole picture but focus on elements. If you get lucky, you may just pick the thing that eliminates all others.

E.g. On 11 on the same page, I would again look from right to left. Ignoring everything else that is going on, my eye is drawn to the top egg-timer which never moves position. This fact immediately eliminates a, b and d. This leaves you with just two possibilities. With only two left I often dwell on their differences to make my final selection--in this case c because of the middle row of balls.

On 10, I would approach colour first. I'd say to him black black black, black white black, black black black, black white black, therefore black black black. Stroke out a, b, d. Then you might do number i.e. no nicks (or whatever you want to call it) 1 nick, 2 nicks, 3 nicks, therefore 4 nicks so must be E.

While elimination may sound a bit laborious, they quickly get into the habit of doing it this way and it is ultimately quicker than simply studying the whole picture. Also, the less logical the child, the more they need a technique to rigidly follow.

From memory there is an acronym for the various characteristics. I think it is SPANSS --size, position, angle, number, shade, shape. But I am not sure how useful it is as far as the kids are concerned. I can see some of them wasting precious time, laboriously working their way through every one of these, when there is usually only 3 in play at any one time.

I hope some of these late night ramblings help.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 10:52 am 
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Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 439
Hi Fm

Thanks for your response. I will certainly adopt your tips.

The thing that think is so difficult to explain to a child ( and definitely to my DH) is that there is an element of subjectivity in what is the right answer. Whilst you say that answer (ii) is obscure it maybe what the child hits upon. Certainly my DS ( who thinks quite like DH, ) has along the way come up with a handful of answers to questions which are not the published answer but which are equally compelling. How is the child to know that their answer is obscure and not what the publisher intended? Once they have decided on an answer ( for good reason) they don't have time to reflect on whether there might be an alternative.

At the end of the day I guess we as parents will never see the actual 11+ papers and will never know whether the questions are good ( ie only one possible answer) or bad ( two or more possible answers) so perhaps its not worth stressing about ( although I can't stop DS and DH getting stressed when they are sure that their answer is correct or more correct). I just hope that the actual papers have been carefully trialled. Every mark matters ( particularly in an area with super selectives).

Thanks once again

Twinkle


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