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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 3:15 pm 
Hi, everyone,

Has anyboday tried the pratical test of 'How to do 11+ nvr ?' by Bond? If you don't have the book, you can also download the test papr from Bond web site.

I am quite confused with the last two questions in section 4. They are code questions. In general, questions of this type are quite straightforward. But not in th ecase when the shapes are complicated as in these two. Obviously, the shapes can't be represented by only two letters. The problem is how to find the useful part(s) and useless part(s) in the shapes.

For example, question 7, first two shapes both have letter D. We can say D represents 2 small shaded square + 2 2 small unshaded squares. The position of the shaded/unshaded squares is illrelevant. Then answer a is out. First and third shape both have a letter Y. We can say Y represents the type of the shade, in this case diagnal. If yes, then Y should appear in the answer, which is b, but b is wrong!

Ok, if we carry on, second and fifth shape both have W, we can say W represents the type of the shade, in this case vertical. Then answer e is out. From fifth shape, if we say another letter B represents three unshaded small squares, then B should apper in the answer. So, only answer b & d are left. Considering the above paragraph, it should be BY, answer b. But the answer is d.

Where did I do wrong? Are there any tips in finding out what the letter represents in these kind of 'complicated shapes'?

Sorry for the long message, and looking forward to replies.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 1:50 pm 
First of all, I think these are at the hard end of the spectrum so I wouldn't dwell too much on them.
For 7, I think D represents 2 whites, F one white, H no whites and B three whites which makes ours B. Then I think Y means slant section on top right, X means slant section on top left and W means no slant section, in which case ours is X. So answer is BX.
But I would defy most people to calculate that in the 30 seconds available.
Your best hope is your child can recognise the virtually impossible, doesn't waste time on it, makes a guess and moves on. That's what I'd tell my pupils.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:43 pm 
Hi, fm,

Thank you very much for your reply.

Yes, I agree with these are the hard ones and making a guess is much better than doing it in the exam. I noticed that in Bond's sample test papers, the code questions are generally easier than these ones.

Just for curiosity, is there a logic to follow for this kind of questions? Or just experience + 'error and try'?

Thanks again.

Angelal


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 9:22 am 
To Angelal,

I've never really evolved a technique other than telling them always to solve the part which have letters in common first e.g. if the codes are AZ BY CZ DX EY, you would work out why the 'Z' and the 'Y' before tackling what A, B, C and D mean because they are all unique.
In my experience most children find them tricky for the first few times they do them, then they usually find them a doddle with practice. At least they do in AFN and NFER tests but a smattering of the Bond ones (a few in 10 minute test books) are beyond difficult and some of the Athey's require a bit more thought.
At any rate it is the NVR area the vast majority end up with 10/12, 11/12, whereas the majority of children find most alike or most different quite challenging.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 9:52 am 
Hi, fm,

Thanks again. And thanks for the statistics as well. :)

I find it is difficult to increase scores for nvr once a child achieve a certain level, for example, 10/12, or 11/12. nvr is also an area that children easily make mitakes during the exam. There are a few friends' kids who passed with good scores, almost everyone got lower nvr marks compare to vr.

Do you have the same experience? Is that the natural of the two types of questions? As in vr, in most cases, if you can find an answer, you normally know if it is right.

Cheers,

Angelal


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:01 am 
Oddly enough, no. I know non-verbal is meant to be the one you can't really improve but it is actually the area which I find I can improve on quite significantly, provided the child applies the techniques and keeps her head. It's certainly the only one I'd term a level playing field. All other areas I find are dependent on how good their primary school is, how much have they read/been read to, how interested parents are. Some of my past pupils have gained a KE Birmingham place against the odds and on the back of a very good performance in this area.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 8:41 pm 
Hi, fm,

Thanks agian.

Ok, I will see if my daughter can still imporve.

Thanks for all your replies.

Angelal


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