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 Post subject: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:56 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 8:46 pm
Posts: 58
My daughter is in the process of being assessed for ASD but I wanted to know if any has come across her type of her way of behaviour before. When something stressfull or embarassing happens to her she will go out of her way to make sure it does not happen again. For instance,she fell over in the bathroom once because the floor was wet, now she has a ritual of laying down 3 towels on the floor each time she has a bath. Another time her dad picked her up from school and embarassed her (not on purpose) but now she doesn't like him being in public with her just in case he embarasses her again. Does anybody have these sort of issues with their children and how do you deal with them. Although she is being assessed for ASD I have not heard of these issues before with other children with ASD. Also she doesn't tell me why she does these things I have to unravel her like a puzzle to find out why she is behaving in a certain way. Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:06 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 23, 2009 6:18 pm
Posts: 147
Location: NW Kent
Having two boys both with AS i would suggest that your DD is trying to instill some predictability and routine into her world. I would say just go with her on the towel issue she will let go of the behaviour when she is ready and its not affecting anyone :? In the meantime you just have to find somewhere to store/dry the towels every day :) My younger son is overly sensitive to pain and has done some very strange things to prevent himself being hurt again.

On the dad/school problem again its probably just dad behaved unpredictably on the day and therefore mum is a safer bet as she is more predicatable. My two have had (and sometimes still do) some very "mummy, mummy" times particularly when things are different i.e. parties, holidays etc because they spend far more time with me and although i do do things differently and react differently they know me far better.

If and when you venture futher into the world of ASD you will hear many funny stories of the things children do. No 2 ASD kids are the same they are all very different. Someone described it to me as a bike wheel with many spokes and each child has differeing degrees of problem/issues on only some of the spokes, so each child is very very different and vey importantly things will chop and change an awful lot. Sometimes you think your child will never move on from a particular stage and then suddenly you realise things have altered but not necessarily in the way you would have expected.

Fluffy


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:25 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 8:46 pm
Posts: 58
Thank you, that makes sense. I find it's not always the behaviour that's a problem, but trying to find out why she doing things in a particular way can be so frustrating and worrying. Do you have any tips for stumbling blocks on school work. We did some of her school 11 plus homework last night; some of the question types she can get all right, but others she finds difficult make herl panic and not want to try at all. In fact she told me to take the homework out of her bedroom and keep it in mine :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:18 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 23, 2009 6:18 pm
Posts: 147
Location: NW Kent
Yes once you begin to understand where they are coming from it gets a little easier :D Its when things are on a downward spiral and you forget this that things get a bit tetchy in our house :?

Having not done the 11+ home tutoring bit for my first DS i'm not certain of all the question types. I could only suggest that generally when one of my DS's doesn't understand something, academically or otherwise, i try to relate it to some other situation that they do understand and then relate that across to where i want them to be. Over the years i have spent a lot of time feeling not listened to when trying to explain something/ compare something or compare situations just to realise later that it has indeed sunk in :idea: It may be a case of building confidence and breaking the question down, not necessarily in a homework style situation (in the car or elsewhere) to take the pressure off then transfer what hopefully has been understood back to the homework/tutoring situation.

Fluffy


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 9:44 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 8:46 pm
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Thanks Fluffy


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:07 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 8:46 pm
Posts: 58
Hi,
does anyone have any experiences of their child being diagnosed for ASD. My daughter is being referred to Camhs but I want to prepare her before. What sort of things do they ask or do in order to make an assessment. I would really appreciate any info as it's all a bit daunting!


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 7:56 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 7:46 pm
Posts: 308
Location: Bucks
DS was referred to CAMHS but I think it was after he was diagnosed. It was all very gentle stuff and was mainly to help him with his anxieties. Not sure what they do when it is part of the diagnosis process.

I think it just sounds a bit scary when you are told you child is seeing a child psychologist but the one we saw was very nice.

Maybe someone else can help you with what they are likely to ask regarding diagnosis.


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 6:41 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:10 pm
Posts: 1068
Location: Lincolnshire
DD diagnosed a long time ago by community paediatrician (she was, I think, 7 and had had a 2 day multidisciplinary assessment when she was 3 but had not been diagnosed then). I wrote a letter to the paediatrician beforehand, giving the history and what was happening at the time because I recalled that a long time had been spent on this previously. The first thing the paediatrician said to me was that she was sorry that DD had not been diagnosed at 3 but that they had made a lot of progress since then in recognising autistic spectrum disorders in girls. I don't remeber DD herself being asked a great deal directly - she played on the floor and the paediatrician occasionally "joined in" or asked something related to what she was doing to gently lead in to a question about school or home. It was certainly not threatening or uncomfortable for her.


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2009 1:35 pm
Posts: 290
Location: kent
My nephew has AS. (Not diagnosed until age 10) My sister in law was very stressed about the assesment, but it was completely fine in the end. She had to fill in a questionaire first (lots of q's about behaviour) Then a v informal appointment in a relaxed atmosphere (nephew gets very stressed in unfamiliar places and situations)which took place in their own home.
He actually quite enjoyed it apparently and participated as much/little as he felt comfortable with. This was all fine as the staff(there were two) were both very experienced and easy going.
My friend also had an assesment for ASD, but theirs was at a child health unit which also went ok. Child refused to speak, but it didn't seem to phase the doctor at all. (I expect they have seen everything)
I really wouldn't worry too much. Life has been so much better for my nephew and his family since they began to develop a better understanding of his condition and find ways of supporting him.


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 Post subject: Re: ASD behaviour
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:25 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 8:46 pm
Posts: 58
Thanks for your reassuring replies. I'm not sure now how to broach the subject with her. Last time she saw the ed pysc 2 years ago she was really upset with me. Not really sure why, so I want to make sure I don't add to her anxieties by saying the wrong thing. It took a long time last time to rebuild her trust, even now she will say things like ' don't tell my teacher'. :(


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