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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:40 pm 
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My lovely DS has just been assessed for dyspraxia and it looks like he will get a diagnosis - I am still waiting for the final report. He just failed the 11+ but has high CAT scores and level 5's. I am thinking whether to appeal for a GS place
I am trying to work out what would be best for DS. He has passed the entrance test for local indie with an academic award. The indie would be smaller classes and logistically works very well in terms of getting to and from school for DS. DS likes the school more so than the GS alternatives but would still have to pay a proportion of fees which is just about do-able.

Local GS would be bigger and more difficult to get to so I am inclined to take the indie offer but am interested to know if any one has experience of a child with dyspraxia in GS - coping with sport / handwriting / organisation / homeworketc


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:57 pm 
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Hi DC, just saw your post and wanted to wish you well whatever you decide..though obviously a bit downhearted you were brilliant with everyone.. Your kindness has not been forgotten and I'm sure whatever challenges your child faces he will overcome them with you at his side. X


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 1:09 pm 
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A good GS will be able to cope with dyspraxia - I've taught several pupils with this diagnosis.

A chat with the SENCo will usually tell you whether the school 'understands' the needs and can meet them.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 1:58 pm 
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Location: South Bucks
Our local GS deals with my son's dyspraxia and dyslexia brilliantly well and SO much better than the well-regarded upper school he spent a year at. He has even won accolades for sport!

However, from your description of the situation I would be inclined to choose the indie (if you can), especially if they are fully aware of the situation and feel he would be a good fit at their school. I say this not least because dyspraxic children often have social and emotional issues which suit a smaller environment. In other words, it is the size and feel of the school that I think is crucial. I also think that your DS may have a more positive attitude in facing the inevitable challenges at the school that he preferred, ie he may blame you for making him go to the GS (when it gets hard) even if it would have been just as difficult at the indie.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:13 pm 
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Thanks Guest 55 and drummer - I think I know DS will suit the indie more - he has been in a small class at his primary school - 17 when he started and 25 now. The school are aware of a possible diagnosis of dyspraxia and seem happy to be able to accomodate any recommendations from the OT and supervising doctor.

If he was going to a state school would he need some sort of statement to be able to get the resources needed? ie probably needs to be allowed to use a lap top, may need a scribe or extra time for exams.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:36 pm 
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No you don't need a statement for that sort of support. As long as using a laptop is 'usual' then that is fine - slow handwriting and faster typing would indicate this need.

Additional time would follow a diagnosis of dyspraxia along with slow handwriting. This support continues whilst they are at school and at University.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:32 pm 
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No statement required (nor probably possible) just a good SENCO and a practical pragmatic attitude (and available resources of course).

My son was one of the reasons his school invested in laptops BUT, that said, he HATES using one in class and in fact now, point blank, refuses to do so,

Useful helps are someone checking that the homework assignment has been legibly written down and is understood. Someone checking that DS knows what to do with the handout he has been given (ie where to stick it in!). A good VLE is a bonus, my DD's school has a very good one which means you as the parent can see what they are supposed to be doing etc.

I also have one caution for you. As things get tougher and you are meeting with various subject teachers who may say DS needs to be working harder on this that or the other it is VERY easy to fall into the trap of offering up his SpLD as an excuse. The fact is he needs to work harder than his peers might have to and find ways to compensate - figure out how to enable him to achieve (organisation systems, study techniques etc) not offer up excuses and understanding for failure.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:58 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2012 5:55 pm
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Hi DC17C!

When I was a Teaching Assistant, I worked very closely with a boy with a Full Statement for dyspraxia. Our relationship was based on a type of trust and quite a bit of tough love from me, with just a bit of technical innovation here and there. This was in a non-selective State school.

The staff had been wonderful with him since Year 7, both technically and with their patience and kindness. If anything, he got away with it at times! The SENCo had raised sons herself, was very experienced in SEN and herself originally a Maths Teacher. I reckon all of this helped enormously.

It depends so much on the individual mix of various conditions, the child's personality and the family. But I would choose the school with the most substantial expertise and experience with your child's particular needs. There will be tough moments but he will be fine in the long term.

You can PM me if you wish. ... Good luck!


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 4:57 pm 
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Thanks for the info I suppose in some ways it is brilliant DS has achieved what he has so far School have encouraged him to try to do things that he would not do at home because they look too hard to do, and I have come up strategies at home for making sure home work gets done etc. I think I worry most about things like practical chemistry, physics etc which ds is really excited to get involved with.

That is interesting about not liking to use a laptop in the classroom - I am not sure how easy it will be to carry one around from class to class- do any children use other technology such as Ipads or other tablets? Would they be easier to carry around?


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2012 5:52 pm 
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Many schools use netbooks - they are small with long-life batteries and can be put into stand-by in lesson changes.


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