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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 269
Location: somewhere in kent
Hi there,
thought I would jot a line or two as I cant see any referece to Aspergers
on the other posts.
I have always been very proud of my son, who unless it is a complete mistake, never does anything wrong. I now know that this perfection
came from fright of doing anything wrong, and the need to go by the structure of rules. He was made Head Boy as a result of his good manners
and hardwork. Last year he took his 11plus, he is slow but accurate.
He failed by one point.
Soley with the help of contributors on this website, we appealed.
On the day of the appeal, one of the panel may have suspected somthing from my submition, as stangley she asked, would we describe Christopher,
in any way as geeky. We agreed.
His last teacher was only just qulified, and suggested Aspergers to us..
It was not an issue until he got into the Grammer School, with unfamiliar
people. He was only diagnosed this Friday, and this seems a releif to him.
I think he will be just fine, now that he understands why he feels so anxious all the time. I understand that some very famous intelligent people had Aspergers syndrome. I think that Christopher will fill their shoes with his ambition to become a Scientist.

God bless you all

Cindy and Christopherxx


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:26 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: caversham
cindy wrote:
He was only diagnosed this Friday, and this seems a releif to him.I think he will be just fine, now that he understands


Cindy,

Take time out. Diagnosis is a big step, not given lightly and not given until the family are ready. It helps everybody to understand and plan for the future but it does not change you or your wonderful child. Best wishes.

stevew61


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11942
You now need to look into what support you can get for him - understanding how to develop his strengths is important.

Is a statement being recommended? This might make accessing the right help easier -


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 269
Location: somewhere in kent
Thanks steve61 and Guest55,

Your comments are appreciated.

Guest55, I keep hearing people talk about a statement, what is that?

I assume that it is the letter that the Doctor has said that she will send me,
his school and the Doctors, which she said will confirm her diagnosis?

Regards

Cindyx


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:28 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: caversham
cindy wrote:
a statement, what is that?
Cindyx


You will receive a letter confirming diagnosis, but there is a big gap between medical and educational needs and available help.. As you have said understanding by you, your child and school may be the best way forward.

Take time out.

Extra help is rationed by needs and budget.

sw61


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:34 pm 
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Posts: 11942
Hi,

A statement is the next step - ask the school SENCo about it - the letter will be part of the evidence you will need.

http://www.actionasd.org.uk/statement.html might help


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:36 pm 
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Location: somewhere in kent
thanks guest55.


cindyx


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: caversham
Sorry. Did not answer your question, probably avoiding it. A statement is a LEA document after an assessment confirming extra help ( budget=money ) for your child.

Current rumor says you have to demonstrate your child is three years behind his peer group or ability. So very hard to achieve but asking does sometimes produce extra help without a formal statement.

sw61


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:24 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 269
Location: somewhere in kent
Hi steve61,

Thanks for your reply, sure it is much clearer to me now..

I understand that a lot of Aspergers are v intelligent, so I suppose he wont need this "statement". It would help if people could just understand
him better though, to consider his thoughts and feelings, as he is way more anxious than the average person.
When my husband and I discussed Christophers diagnosis, we now beleive
from what we know that my husband too has this, albeit high functioning.
In this respect I have landed on my feet, married to an intelligent, honest,
but little less social than the average(never in the pub!), v reliable.
Can cirtainly recomend Aspergers as husband material.

Thanks again steve


Cindyx



Cindy


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11942
Children in GS do have statements - as an ex SENCo I know of several.

You need to discuss with the school the best way forward -


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