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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:14 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 12:06 pm
Posts: 209
Location: Rugby
I have read the survey posts which are interesting. But I have noticed the following about many posts on this forum.

Generally the spelling and grammar are of a high standard.
Most questions are useful.
Most posts stay on the point.
Many posters are very knowledgable about 11 plus.
Nearly all posts are polite and not abusive.

So who are we?

Initial thoughts are:
we have been through grammar school ourselves;
we had a successful education;
we probably went to university;
we are probably professional / middle class.

Some other questions.
How many of us are teachers or work in education?
How many of us have chips on our shoulders?

Surely we are also a self selected bunch who have the 11 plus opportunity (this excludes more than half the population), We have DC's who could pass the 11 plus (excludes 80% of the remainder), We have access to internet and the ability to find and use this website.

So when I read the survey that says only a small minority do not prep for 11 plus - I need to think about all those people who don't have the knowledge and skills to prep.

I am not having a political rant. Just pointing out that we are a very small section of society. I am quite happy to be here, but I know that I am not normal.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:49 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:28 am
Posts: 299
Location: kent
Very interesting. Quite accurate, I think (personal opinion).

I wonder how many are like me though. I didn't have a successful education, did not go to univeristy, and am not middle class.

I do however have a professional qualification, gained later in life.

I am not a teacher, neither do I work in education, although I do have a chip on my shoulder.

I have never seen an 11+ paper in my life, and have never prepped my DC for the test, indeed not knowing how to go about it, and not having the money. In a way though, I did prepare him for the world of education by being there for him, talking about what he has learned, asking challenging questions and encouraging him to 'teach' me what he has learnt; this, I suppose is my way of 'prepping' my child, which, from my perspective has been a success, as he passed.

Whichever 'type' of person we are, whether we had a good education ourselves or not, middle class or working class, professional or not, we all have common ground - we all want the very best for our children, and will do whatever we can to help them get there, be it through paying for private tuition, giving them opportunities or helping them in some other way.

One thing we don't do is give up easily, because we believe in our children and that they are worth the fight, and believe that our children deserve the best education that we could possibly give them. Priceless.

Very, very interesting and thought provoking post, DarkEnergy. I am off to ponder.......... :)


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:30 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:39 pm
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Quote:
I am not a teacher, neither do I work in education, although I do have a chip on my shoulder.

I have never seen an 11+ paper in my life, and have never prepped my DC for the test, indeed not knowing how to go about it, and not having the money.


I love this post: honest, touching and a success story.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 10:18 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 11:42 pm
Posts: 186
What a great OP & one which for the majority I would certainly agree with. I like frustrated though, are very much exception to the rule :lol: .
I don't mind telling you that I actually came from a very unpriveliged background (most certainly in terms of schooling). I attended a very good C of E primary school who allowed us to work at our own pace & right up to yr6 (which was then class 4 :lol: ). I worked my socks off & loved school, I worked alongside another boy in my class & we were reguarly in friendly competition with each other, we read the entire schools collection of books & they had to buy a couple of KMP books (at least from what memory serves me, long long time ago :lol: ) just for us as we'd worked through every single SMP card. When it came to 11+ time, my class mate told me he was taking it, so I asked my parents if I could take it, the answer was a firm no, reason given was I had a younger sister who they were too busy with????? These were parents who never attended a single parents evening nor took any interest in what I'd achieved at school, ask them today they wouldn't have a clue!! Now my friend passed his 11+ with such good results that the grammar school took him in the May of that year instead of September (sooo not done now :wink: ). We were at the exact same level in class & I don't mind saying that we were well above the rest of the class, we were often asked to help our peers. So in terms of ability there's no reason why I feel I wouldn't have passed.
On entering our local Secondary school (which wasn't the worst by any means) I had lost interest, I so badly wanted to be at Grammar. I worked just enough to say I'd completed my work, I wasn't a naughty child but I had decided not to bother as no-one cared anyway & just to have fun. In the 3rd year at Secondary it suddenly emerged from our teachers that those in the top 15 or 20% (again can't remember exactly) in our year could go to Grammar school, something again which my parents failed to inform me, even though they later revealed they knew full well as they'd tried to get my older brother in that way!! So being in only the top 25% of that year I didn't go, I never forget my teachers words, 'you only just didn't get in, if only you worked to your full potential'. Words which make me feel regret to this day. So going on throughout the rest of the school time with little or no interest, not realising at any time how much I'd live to regret it. I came out of school with very disappointing GCSE results (all C's & D's).
When I left school I had no direction, my parents had warned me all my school life 'not to bother thinking about college, they could never afford it'. So this is in my mind was no option. So I took it upon myself to get a job with college training alongside it, I hated every minute of it & was very unhappy for the 2 years of training but I was determined not to give it up as I was learning a trade. Once I qualified I left & got a job in a supermarket until I decided what I wanted to do, within 3 months I was working in their general office on the ordering system then about a year following that in their cash office. Then my own family & I relocated with hubby's job & I had a couple of lovely jobs. We've now moved back home & I've finally decided what I would really love to do is study History. So thats my current goal.
Now I most certainly don't feel sorry for myself but boy do I have a chip on my shoulder about how I was brought up :lol:
Although there's one thing to be thankful for, it made me the complete opposite, I get involved with absolutely everything that my 3 DC do & when my DS showed interest in Grammar, I got onto it immediately, I bought some bond books & started his practise, he went on to pass the Bucks, Kent & Medway test, proud? you betcha!! I wholeheartedly agree with frustrated that the one thing we surely all have in common is the desire for the absolute best for our DC's!!!
I do hope I haven't bored anyone to death :oops: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 10:21 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:59 am
Posts: 2001
Quote:
Who are we that post here?


That excludes the guests who vastly outnumber the posters. EEP is a vast repository of information that is available to all, regardless of whether you post or not.

Perhaps the posters represent a small section of our wider users.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:07 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 3:38 pm
Posts: 2083
Location: Maidstone
I am an immigrant, so we happen to be those taking up places in the local schools from local people :cry:

We have lived in this country for nearly 10 years and my country is an ex British colony so education is very similar but sometimes with same things just called different names. We had GCSEs and A levels too and entrance exams to enter some secondary schools (similar to 11+). When I did entrance tests many moons ago there wasnt any preparation but I hear now that savvy parents are coaching and tutoring just like here. The major difference being you have to pay to go to school and not everyone affords it so MANY dont even get that chance to education which I see many kids sadly wasting away here.

I am not sure how I found out about the grammars but it must have been a couple of years ago as I can say most of my immigrants friends are very pro education so the talk was just about grammar schools or the local catholic comprehensive wherever the subject of seconadry school was ever discussed.

In my quest of more information on the 11+ I stumpled on this forum and it has helped me greatly to understand the great British education system and I am slowly becoming a forum addict. No wonder on a sun day like this, I still cant help myself checking this forum

I went to a boarding school (this was really the norm in my country for a decent education and wasnt for the elite). I do have a degree in politics which I havent used of course apart from my foul mouthing the forthcoming general coming elections. If you count that as being useful. My day job involves changing nappies, cooking, cleaning, tutoring my DD and faffing about on the internet trying to make a few pennies. I also enjoy researching and reading on various things that affects how people live.

In my day dreaming, I hope to DD will go to one or two indies if she passes and we get some bursary or scholarship otherwise we would be financially crippled. However thats just like playing the lottery so really a grammar school would be a far more realistic choice if she passes the 11+. If not I havent quite worked out what will happen but in my daydreaming I have often thought it would be better for me to send her back to my home country to a bording school. That sound draconian but before I get slammed some of my local schools scare me. Plus I believe people of my origin have to work very hard and have good education (to me thats my inheritance to my kids as there is nothing else to inherit, if they waste it then thats up to them) for any slight chance of a decent life. I have seen far too many of my own cleaning toilets everywhere I go and it breaks my heart.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 4:02 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 12:06 pm
Posts: 209
Location: Rugby
Hi Sherry D

You do not sound like a typical 11 plus parent to me (if such a thing exists). But what a story to tell... like so many others. A valuable story to many who will read it and know that they are not alone. It is a shame that many people will be helped by your story and they will never tell you.

I hope it goes well with you and your family.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 4:09 pm 
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i think the one typical thing we probably have in common is an interest in our childs education. And thats a positive thing :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 4:11 pm 
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Well done DarkEnergy - love this post - got to read it again before I can even hope to reply.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 4:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 4:04 pm
Posts: 1055
Great post and here's my story. I lived abroad from when I was about two. My parents both were University educated so education was very important in our house. I was surrounded by books and was (and still am) an avid reader. I went to a fee paying convent for my early education. I had a wonderful time there and was taught the curriculum and much more by the nuns who ran the school. I went onto University and have post graduate degrees. I taught for a while at university but became a full time mum whrn my eldest child was born. Being my parent's daughter there was nothing I am not prepared to do for my DC'c education. I am fully involved in their school life and love every minute of it. This is not to say that we don't have fun. I try to teach them about life as well as the curriculum. We have fun days at museums, parks etc. One thing which I tell my DC is that all I ask of them is that they do their best.


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