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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 7:57 am 
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I was talking to a mum at the school last week about the 11+ and she said that her daughter's tutor (children in Y4) had been setting her books to read (Treasure Island and A Christmas Carol) to her mum and then would be doing comprehension on them. Is this a standard practice (which I should be doing with my child!?)?

I have posted on here over the last few months about a 'reluctantly reading' DS, and whilst things are improving-he's listened to a lot of H Potter on audio CD, Stormbreaker and Wolf Brother as well as read all the Diary of a Wimpy Kids, Mr Gum, lots of Jeremy Strong and some Magic Tree House and Jack Stalwart books since March. I didn't think this was too bad going as he said he hated reading completely and was only going to do it because I was forcing him a few months back!

Would a spot of Dickens now finish him off completely!? Is it necessary? Year 5, maybe??


Last edited by Manana on Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 7:59 am 
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I find Dickens really turgid and I am a 54 year old who loves reading!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:06 am 
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yoyo123 wrote:
I find Dickens really turgid and I am a 54 year old who loves reading!


Ha ha-I'm a 34 year old with a degree in English Literature and I don't like Dickens either!

Would you, as an 11+ tutor, set books for your children to read though, Yoyo?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:11 am 
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no


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 9:30 am 
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yoyo123 wrote:
I find Dickens really turgid and I am a 54 year old who loves reading!


Quite. His place in British hearts (or, at least, in what British heads of a certain age and class assert should be in British hearts) is incomprehensible to me, and I'm hardly ill-read. He wrote by the yard for regular publication in a periodical that paid by the word, and it shows. There is an argument (which is nothing to do with his status as a novelist or as a writer of prose) that he was an effective journalist, documenting the spirit of the age, but that's not an argument for children to read him as literature.

I really can't understand the urge to have children read adult novels, which were written by and for adults and historically read by adults, on the grounds that they're somehow improving. A surer way to turn reluctant readers into non-readers is hard to imagine. Usually, people forget their own progression and inflict on their young children what they read and enjoyed when they were older, hoping that somehow this will advance their children and avoid "wasted time". It's a manifestly flawed argument. One might even describe it as Gradgrindian. Oh, whoops.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 9:37 am 
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Quote:
One might even describe it as Gradgrindian. Oh, whoops.


:lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:43 am 
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Hi,
I am also a tutor with parents saying their children will not read what can they do? I would never set a book to read but am happy to provide guidance. One boy recently who would not read, but is an avid football fan, at my suggestion read a footballer's autobiography and loved it. I gave his mum a suggested reading list and they both went into Oxfam and were thrilled to find three of them at a £1.00 each. He is now enjoying Anthony Horowitz.

Sadly, this doesn't always work.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:45 am 
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cocoa0101 wrote:
Hi,
I am also a tutor with parents saying their children will not read what can they do? I would never set a book to read but am happy to provide guidance. One boy recently who would not read, but is an avid football fan, at my suggestion read a footballer's autobiography and loved it. I gave his mum a suggested reading list and they both went into Oxfam and were thrilled to find three of them at a £1.00 each. He is now enjoying Anthony Horowitz.

Sadly, this doesn't always work.


I know, it's lovely when it does though! Do you mind me asking what was on the reading list you suggested?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 2:18 pm 
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Send me your email by pm and i will send it to you.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:53 pm 
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my Ds is in year 4 and and until a year ago he detested reading. It was then i realised how poor his vocab was.He was barely able to understand the meaning of lots of simple words. With plenty of ideas from this forum i started improving his vocab ,made flashcards, read to him a lot, explained a lot to him. Now he is a avid reader and reads Michael Morpugo Harry Potter, Alex rider etc etc. He shot from being middle in English straight on to being at the top of his class. We now spend everyday( on the way to school) 10 -15 mins doing a pack of voacb flash cards, it has made such a difference not only in his understanding but his writing skills as well.

Now to extend his reading i wanted to introduce him to Dickens but when i went thru the books i did not have the heart to make him read the original versions. Hence i went around looking and came across really easy versions of dickens which he loved. Then,recently i came across Usborne dickens, Usborne Classics retold and Puffin classics which are really enjoyable for 8-9 years old. He recently read David Copperfield and Oliver Twist and thoroughly enjoyed them. Rather than putting them off Dickens completely i felt this was such good way to make them know what the story is about and later in the summer holiday I will sit with him and ask him about different characters how he feel they are etc etc just to make sure he know and understands the stories well and if a passage does come in the exam it will not surprise him.

I really do not know whether i am doing the right thing but i just feel Dickens is too much for these little ones, if i detest reading them how can i make him read it. I have learned so much from this forum and i wanted to share my thoughts with all of you, maybe you too can try these books this ways well.


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