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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 8:15 pm 
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From reading the forum, I know that it is not an exact science, but could anyone please give me an idea of what percentage is needed to score, say 118 for the Slough consortium (which I think is around the required mark) for a 10 years 6 months child. And the same for the Bucks schools (not sure what a good mark would be there).

Thank you


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:14 pm 
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faitaccompli wrote:
From reading the forum, I know that it is not an exact science, but could anyone please give me an idea of what percentage is needed to score, say 118 for the Slough consortium (which I think is around the required mark) for a 10 years 6 months child. And the same for the Bucks schools (not sure what a good mark would be there).
The qualification mark in Bucks is 121 every year. (It can theoretically vary, but it doesn't.) This thread will show you what that equates to as a raw score - all the 121 marks on it are actual scores obtained through an FoI request last year viewtopic.php?f=12&t=18356

They do change from year to year, so they are only a guide, as you will see.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:27 pm 
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Is a raw score (for example) - 60 out of 80, or 75%?
TOld you I know nothing!
And what are the Bucks scores out of, if it is the 60 out of 80 scenario?


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:52 pm 
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I think a raw score is what your child actually gets in the paper before standardisation has been taken into account. Getting x/80 would equate to a set % for a particular paper and so could be the same thing.

Or I may be wrong but am open to correction.

_________________
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 10:32 pm 
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OK - so an August born child would need to be getting in the region of 82.5% to get the 121 mark? (assuming they got 66 out of 80)

That is helpful.

Another question though.

If you are a late sitter, then although you may be an August child, you would then be 6 weeks older at the date of the late sitting - so in effect would be equivalent to a June child?


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 11:07 am 
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The scores are all standardised within a month, so an August child would be compared to other August children. The scores do not translate diectly to percentages, they are plotted on a standard curve, then some jiggery pokery is done and the scores are calculated - this is so that roughly the same perecntage pass each year. It is possible for the raw score needed to achieve 121 to be different each year, depending on the cohort of children (and presumably the ease of the paper). There are lots of links to an explanation of this on the forum - if you search on "standardisation" you will find plenty of information.

Quote:
OK - so an August born child would need to be getting in the region of 82.5% to get the 121 mark? (assuming they got 66 out of 80)


No, I don't think so, this would not usually be enough (because it's not a stright line). I think in the 2010 Bucks test an August born needed to get about 68-70 in the two tests to get 121.Have a look at the stickies at the top of the Bucks section.

Edited to add:
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/forum/11plus/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=18356

and:

http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/advice/standardised-scores-an-explanation


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