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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 9:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 111
Hi,

I am now at the stage of doing the gl assessment papers with my dd in preparation for trafford gs exams. We need to do the vr, nvr and maths papers.

I am aware that pack 2 is harder than pack 1 so unsure whether to tackle them in numerical order or not. Has anybody got any suggestions? I am nervous of doing them in numerical order in case her marks slip towards the end if they are harder and it demotivates her but then don't want to start with the hardest either?

Am i thinking about this too hard? :?

What did you do and what approach do you think works best?

Many Thanks

Jm


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 10:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Mmmm - did these years ago with a family member. We didn't particularly focus on what the total score was. Did them in the spirit of learning how to do the various question types as this what these papers are for - they are not supposed to "model" a real 11plus paper set by GL assessment, but demonstrate the various types of question that could crop up.

Don't know if that helps. People get a bit obsessed with total scores at the end of papers but as none of them are the real thing it's not that important ... says she who just sounded frustrated with DD for making a heap of silly mistakes in a Bond 9-10 maths paper today.

Good luck!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 6:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 1:47 pm
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Location: Warwickshire
We found them quite difficult and started on the first one.

I think it is good to start with the easier papers for your dc to gain confidence, whatever papers you are doing.

I don't think you're worrying too much - it's impossible not to worry. I spent most of the time last year worrying and not doing!

Good luck. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 6:32 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:40 pm
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Numerical order works for most of them except I would do NVR 1, 4th - ie nvr 2,3,4,1. NVR 1 is difficult and may be depressing for a first paper. Enjoy!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:19 pm
Posts: 798
Hi

Its been a few years since we did them ( for Trafford also) but I do recall that one of the NVR is very hard- and it wasn't my son's strong point anyway. All I will say is don't start having a breakdown if the scores aren't in the 80's and 90's. I recall my son getting in the 60's and 70's and maybe even a few in the 50's - and he passed for AGSB out of area. I think the GL papers are very difficult and a real jump from Bond.

If you don't feel as though you are running out of time, I'd have a look at the AFN VR papers ( appropriate format for whichever exams you are doing), I found them very good, we did the two packs around now and over the summer holidays.

Good luck, remember the feeling well :)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 9:29 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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If GL assessment sets the Trafford exams the GL papers are going to be the best thing that you can do between now and the time of the exam. These other suggestions sound good too.

If you are concerned that the GL papers will knock your child's confidence because he will not get the same % as on Bond papers etc, then don't do them that way - chop them up etc etc. They are for practising the question types, not for looking at the bottom line score.

Also you could reassure yourself by finding out what raw score the pass mark tends to be at the school(s) you are interested in. To give you an idea, here in Kent we use GL assessment (this is the last year I think) and the raw score for a pass is roughly around the 50% mark - it varies, but it's round about there. This gives you a feel that you can get around half wrong on the day and still pass.

I think it is essential that children get practice doing papers where they can't get 80 - 100% otherwise some will feel bad on the day when they realise they are not getting everything right. Exam technique where they learn to guess and move on if they are struggling with a question is vital, and not get flustered. Being lulled into a "secure" feeling at home with papers that they can get 100% on is not good preparation. It might feel like you are giving them confidence, but it's not teaching them useful exam technique.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:07 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 111
Thankyou all so much for the replies.

I think my thoughts were around wanting to see an upward trend on scores ( hopefully) when she was working through them and knowing that they were different difficulties wasn't sure if that would work.

Tiddlymum - those scores do make me feel better my heart always sinks when I hear about people getting 90+%.
Nkm - I didn't know that about the nvr papers so I will follow your advice
Mystery - You have offered a new perspective on getting difficult papers that I had never thought about and I love that thinking. You are absolutely right that they need to experience not being able to do questions and have skills to not panic and approach them methodically.
Ginx - the worry seems to have taken over me more than last time. Think because I am DIYing and feel the responsibility more. It seems to be in my thoughts most of the time!

My action plan will be start with easier pack 1 then onto pack 2 explaining to her that these are much harder and not to get fixed on scores alone.

Thanks again

JM
x


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:10 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Yes - if it were me I'd forget the notion about upward scores. There's really no point to that. It's about preparing for the day. If your tests are set by GL Assessment then the most important thing is that you practice these GL assessment question types and get to be able to do the ones she can't do easily right now. That's the point of the preparation. You can get upward scores by repeating papers if that would be a good feeling.

If your tests are not set by GL assessment then maybe don't bother with these papers?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:33 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:01 pm
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Location: Herts
Such a good point Mystery about learning to fail and let go and move on to get other marks and forget about that mark. I really think able students have the most problem with that as they are so used to succeeding in everything and being unchallenged top of class. They need to be constantly reminded that the goal is to finish the paper and get the most total marks, not waste time trying to get everyone right. That is why I do not believe able students can do well without being taught exam technique especially in the 100 questions in 45mins VR exams. I had a very able student who walked into a VR mock full of confidence. Wished good luck by his mother he turned and said in a very loud voice I won't need it. Sadly he had to leave before the feedback session as he had not even got halfway through the 100 in 45 mins. He was so used to success he could not let go and move on. I teach my students to count in the head, ten seconds and still not started it, move on. DG


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 10:28 am
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It's vital that the children learn about exam technique. Part of that is indeed, learning how to cope on the day with something you feel you've done badly. In our competitive sport, we have to learn to forget what has passed in a previous round: if we feel we've done badly, then it can't be allowed to influence how we approach the next round. Over the years, both DD's have learned how to forget what has passed and move on. Despite having an in-built fear of failure, they were able to transfer their sport mental-skills to the 11+ approach. In Essex, we have three papers, with the most important coming right at then end - DD dreaded the first one the most and she learned to ignore how she felt about it, to avoid jeopardising her chances on the others.

We also encouraged our DD's to embrace mistakes - they help us to improve and grow strong. Mistakes are good.

She had something she could use if she felt anxious - she would twist her left earlobe anti-clockwise to "switch the panic off" and twist the right earlobe clockwise to "switch the brain- juice on", so it would flow down her right arm to her writing hand :lol: Worked everytime because panic interrupts the flow of brain- juice! :lol:


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