Go to navigation
It is currently Sun Dec 11, 2016 1:55 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 10:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 11:18 pm
Posts: 33
my daughter is just 10 now 15 days back. i have heard that she would get some extra marks or something similar to that in her 11 plus exam . what is basically that will 2 or 3 marks be added to her total or its something else. tried to read here 11 plus advice on this wrbsite but v complicated statistical procedure.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 8:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4608
No extra marks - see explanation in link below

http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/advice ... xplanation


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 11:18 pm
Posts: 33
thanks a billion. i re read it n now got this term standardisation.....however v complicated procedure. but soemhow younger children will get benifit from this


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 4608
The whole point is that there is no advantage or disadvantage according to age.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:50 pm
Posts: 17
scary mum wrote:
The whole point is that there is no advantage or disadvantage according to age.


If 2 children, one 10 years 1 month, the other 11 years, do the same tests and both score lets say 80%, the will have different marks due to the standardisation process. So the older child needs to get a higher % in the tests to get the same mark. This is fair, unlike virtually every other test they do, in which the older child gets the advantage of their increased development and experience.

The problem is, that as far as I can find, there is no information available on how strong the standardisation is. In other words, what the difference is in % terms between pass marks at the various ages.

To add complication, there is an appeal process, and borderline pupils may benefit from higher SATs scores etc, giving an advantage to older pupils. In our area (Wirral), it seems like a large proportion of pupils get through via this route, rather than with a straight test pass, so when you take the process as a whole into account, there is probably a bias in favour of the older pupils after all.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
In the old Kent test it would seem that the difference between oldest and youngest at any particular standardised score is about two or three correct answers (depends on the paper - but out of about 50 to 80 questions).

Maybe on these new CEM papers where there seem to be so many more questions in the time the age standardisation will be more refined than this.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 10:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 26, 2013 7:38 pm
Posts: 59
I'm sure many people will disagree with myself. I am not a fan of this process. When I was a child you had 3 seperate intakes for schooling September, Christmas and Easter. When it was set like this I believe that it was fair.

For example I know three children one was born on the 2nd of September, the second on the 18th of June and the third on the 31st of August. Now they all started pre school the same week, they all started school the same day and they all sat the 11 plus the same time. So why is it fair that the youngest child gets awarded more.

When children are at home they get taught the basics which is nothing like when they start school.

I'm sure people will disagree with my opinion but I'm just not a believer in it when everything else has changed.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4025
Location: Reading
Its not just about when children start school. My DD born in July started school at Easter and has just started in year 7, so there are still children affected by the various start dates anyway. The late start affected my DD and the effect was felt by us at least right into year 4.The Easter starters were behind right from the start.

However the main difference is also due to brain maturity and simple length of time. A child born in September will have had a years worth more time taking in vocab (at a rate of 1000 words a year apparently) and a brain that is a year older compared to a August born. That's a significant at 10/11 years old.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11958
However what about extremely premature births; the whole system is unfair to them!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8228
Yes, I have always thought the whole thing should be based on length of gestation.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016