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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:42 am 
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Location: RBK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-25798659

Some body going bonkers or looking for more business for their independent schools.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:58 am 
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http://www.smf.co.uk/files/2613/9009/3422/20130119_Seldon_Schools_United_Web.pdf
This is the report from the think tank based in London

Looks like one ceiling at £80K and another one at £200k in terms of joint income. 1% of the population has a dual income of £200k and the report suggests that those parents who have kids in the top state schools should pay fees equal to this being paid in private sector..


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 11:23 am
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Location: Essex
sbarnes wrote:
http://www.smf.co.uk/files/2613/9009/3422/20130119_Seldon_Schools_United_Web.pdf
This is the report from the think tank based in London

Looks like one ceiling at £80K and another one at £200k in terms of joint income. 1% of the population has a dual income of £200k and the report suggests that those parents who have kids in the top state schools should pay fees equal to this being paid in private sector..


I have absolutely no problem with this, as long as that 20k a year is before tax so if you make 60k a year the tax office taxes you at 40k a year whilst paying the school fee years...like that would happen :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:17 pm 
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It is a shame that the only publicity this report is likely to see will relate to the proposed charge - which will no doubt see a flurry of outraged letters to newspaper editors tomorrow. There are 60 pages there and only one or two talk about this proposal. Seldon has a mix of the pragmatic and the slightly insane, as ever, but the deeper issues of dreadful inequality in our system are ones which will not go away - it is really sad if the press can't see beyond the clearly controversial notion of charging the middle classes and to the issues which lie behind it. Seldon is always going to have a particular take on the matter which won't involve doing away with private schooling, given his own vested interests there, but the report makes an interesting introduction to the idea that we can't go on as we are. As he says,
Quote:
By 2010, independent schools had few friends left amongst academics, commentators and virtually no friends in high places in politics. Report after report, showing the advantage that an independent school education provides, has meant that most now would agree with the columnist David Aaronovich that the schools offer ‘an immoral advantage that is getting ever more exclusive.’

He goes further then, going on to address the middle class stranglehold on good state schools is helping to establish a link between independents and high-performing (often selective) state schools which I think is necessary and overdue- until this 'uniquely British problem' as he calls it, is addressed head on, our society will continue to perpetuate the pernicious inequity and inequality which poisons any notion of education reform. His solutions are radical and probably unworkable, but we need to listen to the reasons he is proposing them, imho, and not get hung up on the idea we might have to open our wallets.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:08 pm 
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The problem is not that the middle classes (definition required here really) have a "stranglehold" on good state schools but rather that the middle classes COMPRISE good state schools. If there are no middle class pupils in a school it is not very likely to even be a good state school.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:19 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
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Location: Chelmsford and pleased
magwich2 wrote:
The problem is not that the middle classes (definition required here really) have a "stranglehold" on good state schools but rather that the middle classes COMPRISE good state schools. If there are no middle class pupils in a school it is not very likely to even be a good state school.

Tosh!

I have a lot to do with state primary schools, some in very deprived areas of inner London with no middle class parents at all. Many rated good or outstanding; one of them was second in its borough last year through the dedication and very hard work of the head and teaching staff.
Both Tower Hamlets and Hackney, not often described as middle-class areas of London are often cited as being very successful and attainment in the schools in these areas is often beyond that in 'middle class' villages.

Fortunately, the children in these areas are being given an education that will enable them to be contributing members of our future society. This is where the additional funding needs to be applied and maintained so that the current trends continue. It certainly shouldn't be given to very wealthy independent schools who pay no tax for the benefit of very few children.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 5:41 pm 
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In my simpke world, a state school is for those who are members of the state regardless of income background!!

What next, the NHS...


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 6:56 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:59 pm
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While increasing social mobility is a laudable aim, I'm not sure the headmaster of one of the country's most exclusive private schools is the best-placed person to be espousing it… And if I did have a child at Wellington College I'm not sure how pleased I would be that he seems to spend as much time writing books (at least half-a-dozen during his time there) and other media work as he does running the school :roll:

Perhaps Dr Seldon wants middle-class parents to pay for state education so that his school's fees (c £30,000pa) seem better value :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 7:17 pm 
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Fails to acknowledge that all employed people already pay for education - through their taxes, at up to 50% for the highest earners already!

We scrape to pay for one child at private primary as the local primary school was not stretching her to her ability (also already paying for her at state school through taxes - no rebate here!), and have another DD at grammar (where they ask for money to top up what they get from the government every week!)

Sorry - but state schools are for everyone - paid through taxes. Full stop!


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 7:20 pm 
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No argument from me;


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