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 Post subject: results and age
PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 4:36 pm 
Hi

I expect to be moving to the Essex area sometime during the next six months so have been reading this forum trying to learn all i can ready for my son taking the test next year.

My son has just started year 5 and got the following results in his year 4 SAT's
Maths 4A
Reading 4C
Writing 3C
Science 4C
BUT his birthday is late August so he'll be almost a year younger than some.

Can someone please give me some advice
I've read that Essex schools don't take age into account in their results, but was wandering if his results of his year 4 SAT's have taken age into account.
If SAT's are adjusted to allow for age differences then i would like to know his level without the adjustment to see how he would fair against the older ones in the same year if we decide to apply for the Grammers.

thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 5:13 pm 
These SATs are not age adjusted. They are designed to indicate the national curriculum level which your child has attained, rather than to provide a comparison with children of the same age.

When the KS2 SATs are taken in year 6 I believe that NFER produce a table allowing schools or parents to work out an age-adjusted standardised score based on their actual scores in the tests. These would appear as scores between 70 and 140, with 100 being the national average for a child that age. This information is in addition to the SATs level (eg 4A or 5) achieved and most schools don't give parents these standardised scores (unless they ask). You can find previous tables on the NFER website which might give you an indication of the spread across the age range.

I suggest that you try not to get to hung up on SATs scores, however, as they bear limited relation to the 11+ exams which are designed to test potential not just prior attainment.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 3:11 pm 
Sorry, correction to above post. The age standardised stuff is on the qca website, not NFER. Reference is http://www.qca.org.uk/libraryAssets/med ... 05_wo1.pdf or get there via links from qca.org.uk !


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 4:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 11948
However - NC levels do give a good idea as to whether your child will cope with the acaddemoc demands - for Y4 these are fine!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 10:38 am 
Maybe you should move to Medway , our test is so heavliy weighted, in favour of the younger one's , even the head teacher said children born in August have the best chance .
I was already feeling very annoyed about it , due to my older daughter missing by 10 , when younger ones were creeping through by 1 or 2 point's , but for her to actually say it !
As an example , the minimum weighting is 70 . I'm not saying the younger children should not get extra , but that amount is ridiculous.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 8:45 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2007 9:25 am
Posts: 229
That's really interesting. Every school and authority seems to have it's own set of rules. Our child is August birthday - but the school we applied for do not adjust the scores to reflect age - hence he was competing against children who had physically spent a whole year longer in school. Perhaps we should move to Medway? I can see a big influx of families seeking homes in your area with every child an August baby!!! :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:47 am 
Also , i recently found out , boys getting extra points as well !!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:19 pm 
Children who are born in September DO NOT spend an extra year at school compared to children born in August! They start school at the same time. You might say that they have had a whole year extra in the world but they have had exactly the same amount of schooling!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:45 pm 
In some areas of the country younger children do spend less time at school. January intakes for children born after 1st May is not uncommon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 4:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:49 pm
Posts: 1647
Location: berkshire
In some primary schools they have a staggered intake...... Being a July born my son started school after the easter break. Other children in his year group started in Sept & Jan. (The term in which they turn 5)


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