Go to navigation
It is currently Fri Dec 09, 2016 5:32 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 2:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Hi
I'm trying to find out what adjustments have been made in 11+ exams in all areas for dyslexics and/or dyspraxics. Please share information about what type of adjustment was granted, and it would also be very useful to hear what sort of evidence was required to apply for the adjustment. I have already asked this question in the Appeal forum, but related specifically to Bucks this year, but had no replies even though lots of people have read the post.

This should make interesting reading. And if there are no replies, that is interesting too.

Thanks!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:07 pm
Posts: 501
Not in Bucks, but no allowance / adjustments for my dyspraxic DS in our area. But more importantly I have never known any kind of access arrangements in my 25+ years of teaching. Pupils who have scribes / readers/ extra time for SATs have no such luxury for 11+. However some people may be successful in arranging access that I am unaware of.
Back in the day a partially sighted girl attended my GS - fairly sure there must have been some adjustments to the process / paper for her.
Having said all that my DS has been well supported at GS and access arrangements for GCSEs and A levels have been in place.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:02 pm
Posts: 2151
One of my daughter's friends is dyslexic (to what degree I am not certain) and was given a few minutes extra time when she sat the first stage of the Tiffin Girls' school 11+ exam. I don't know how they decided how much time to allocate. She was apparently in a room with other children who had also been given extra time, for whatever reason. She did not pass, and I'm afraid I don't know whether any of the other girls did.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 1:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:41 pm
Posts: 44
As mentioned in your Bucks response, but will repeat here (and add a bit more) to keep all information together.

Bexley awarded 25% extra time for dyslexia. Kent awarded 10% extra time for the written assessment (only looked at if there is a Head Teachers review) but no extra time for the tests (Maths, English and Reasoning).

For Bexley, either the parent or the school can apply for allowances e.g. extra time. They have a useful document on their web site telling you what they are looking for and what sort of information to send. I found them very efficient and we received a response before the school summer holidays. The test was sat just with other children with various special needs (about 20? or so) on a different day.

For Kent, only the school was allowed to apply and all dealings were direct with the school. We were only aware of the 10% extra time for the written assessment and no additional time for the tests after we returned to school in September. We are OOC so the test was sat at a centre at the same time as all other OOC children, but in a classroom just for those awarded 10% extra time for the written assessment (4 in our test centre).

I am curious to know if anyone in Kent was awarded anything different for dyslexia.

On both occasions an Educational Psychologists report (less that 2 years old) stating DC was entitled to extra time, was submitted and a letter of support from the school. Kent may have asked the school for additional information that I am unaware of.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 9:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2014 11:19 am
Posts: 12
Hi,

My daughter is moderate to severe dyslexic and took the Sutton exams this year (sorry - we are not in Bucks, but the info might help anyway).

She was allowed extra time in the exam and sat in a small room with other girls (about 10) she said, who were also allowed extra time.

We had to submit a report from the Educational Psychologist in time for the deadline specified by Sutton, which was reviewed by SEN teachers who decided if extra time would be allowed.

DD passed the exams, which I don't believe she would have if she hadn't been allowed extra time, as her processing speed/reading is slow in comparison to other children of her age.

Hope this helps and good luck!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2014 5:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:55 pm
Posts: 234
Thanks Happy, and well done for sorting out the adjustments for your DD. I'd like to know whether the Ed Psych was arranged privately and independently? And also, because these terms aren't standardised, I'd like to know what the terms "moderate to severe" were based on. You mentioned slow processing speed - would you mind sharing the Standardised Score?

We had to apply for extra time on the basis of a dyslexia screening test done in school, which showed "very few signs of dyslexia". We had an ed psych report showing poor processing speed and signs of dyspraxia, but we were told that it was too told too be used - at the time of applying it was 18 months old - even though the guidance states that ed psych reports up to 2 years old can be used. School didn't repeat the processing speed tests which showed slow processing speed, although they did repeat the ones that showed normal speed. :? DD didn't pass and we've since (in the last fortnight) had her tested independently again, and the report shows a combination of dyslexia and dyspraxia and a requirement for extra time, meeting the criteria for GCSE, A Level and university extra time (if she was of the right age to be tested). School has already started trialing extra time in school and will apply for extra time for SATS. All of three of these documents have been submitted for review, along with the Occupational Therapy and Behavioral Optometry report. I hope the review panel has time to read them!

I am not sure why the school assessment did not diagnose the dyslexia, I'm not expert in this, but it didn't sound right. I don't know whether a dyslexia screen can't identify the problems of a dyslexic-dyspraxic, or whether the tests were rushed, or whether the tester didn't have the expertise of someone who does this full time, or whether someone based in school isn't independent, or whether the child isn't at ease in the school offices, or whether there were problems with administration. Maybe a combination of all of the above. If I didn't know the strong family history, that it is possible to be bright and disabled by specific learning difficulties, I could well have given up after the school assessment.

Mehere, the Kent approach sounds flawed. first, are the schools independent enough to do this fairly? Bright dyslexics don't really cause them a problem as they usually cope well enough, although nowhere near their potential. They are clever enough to sort out coping strategies and muddle through. Junior schools won't divert resources to meet their special needs if they can get away with it. As for no extra time in exams - I wonder if that breaks discrimination law? If there are special needs departments at universities (including Oxbridge) with students needing extra time, and at A levels, and at GCSEs, why not at 11+? I think there is a widely-held attitude that if a child needs support, they cannot be grammar school material. :shock: :roll: :x


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2014 11:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2014 11:19 am
Posts: 12
Hi Bumblebeez,

We arranged privately for the Ed Pysch, no testing has been done in her Junior School nor have they made any arrangements to help her at all following the report, it has all been lip service without any action. They won't even give her extra time in her mock SATS. It seems to be their opinion that because she is above average, that she doesn't need any extra help.

The term "moderate to severe dyslexia" came from her Ed Pysch report and was based on definitions provided by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA).

Are you asking me for her standardised processing speed from the Ed Pysch report? I don't mind sharing it if that helps, but I will have to go and look it up first :-)

To me it sounds like you are doing the right thing by appealing. I don't see how they can reject a 18 month old report as being too old, when the guideline were 2 years. Anyway, dyslexia is not something that goes away or gets better over time.

I would imagine that a school tester does not have the same expertise as an Ed Psych, so therefore I would recommend that you get your DD tested by an Ed Psych, who specialises in dyslexia.

Hope this helps.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2014 2:31 pm 
Online

Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:59 am
Posts: 1663
Hi Bumblebeez,

A dyslexia screening is very different from an assessment. I hear that the screening only takes from 30 to 45 minutes whereas the assessment takes 3 hours. Which one did your daughter have?

You are doing the right thing by appealing, good luck!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016