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 Post subject: Tutors
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:04 am 
I would be interested to know from parents who have used tutors, what exactly the tutor does that you couldn't do at home using the books and papers widely available.

I had not previously considered hiring a tutor, but as it seems that many other parents consider them very valuable, I would not want by son to be at a disadvantage.

Thanks for any advice.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:12 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:08 am
Posts: 103
I agree with you that you could probably do most of what a tutor does at home yourself but I don't think my daughter would have been as willing to sit down and work with me as she has with her tutor. Going to her tutor once a week and then completing her homework during the rest of the week has given a discipline to the whole process which I think would have been missing if I had tried to do it myself with her. However, each child is different and your child may not need this structure to her learning like my daughter has!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:30 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 4:14 pm
Posts: 739
Location: Gloucester
I agree with KM.You have to know your child and how they learn to make the tutor decision.I could have quite easily tutored at home,using papers etc from this site,and it would have saved loads of money,however I just couldn't stand the strops and arguments that it would have caused.DS was far happier having a tutor once a week,who came to the house( and he would never have dared to strop in front of him!!!).
There is lots of great info on this site if you decide to home tutor,

Regards,Glosmum.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:33 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2660
g bexley wrote:
what exactly the tutor does that you couldn't do at home using the books and papers widely available.



Dear g bexley

Speaking as a tutor [Bucks], I offer 2 'courses' one where I would teach the child 1 to 1 or two, where I teach the parents , explaining the techniques, books to buy and just being at the other end of the phone for any problems that may arise. [occaisionally I would visit the child for the odd lesson if they are having difficulty with a particular type of question]

Both options get taken up. The one to ones tell me that they just know their child would not listen to them.

I post on this forum in order to help those who wish to DIY, you do not NEED a tutor, however sometimes the private route is a preferred option for some. If you want a tutor, you MUST do your homework, ensuring your child is being taught the correct curriculum. If you DIY you MUST ensure you are teaching from the correct products.

Patricia

Ps, I do not take tutoring buisness from this forum, I am always happy to help parents DIY via forum or personal messages...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:55 pm 
I agree entirely with the other posts. My eldest son started to stall with his writing in year 4. I decided he needed more help from me, but after a few sessions on his writing we were both in tears! I have a degree in English and just assumed it would be a doddle for me to help him. But I couldn't understand what his problems were and he couldn't understand me! So, I sent him to a tutorial centre once a week where one tutor works with small groups of children (4 or 5). His writing improved and I decided to leave him there in the run up to the 11+ (which he passed). I felt at the time that most of what the centre was doing with him I could have done at home but I gleaned useful information from the centre about how the 11+ works.

I thought I wouldn't bother with the centre for my second son (who has just sat his 11+) but, as soon as we started to practice he resisted me every inch of the way. So, off to the centre he went. He adored his tutor, co-operated totally with him and got on well with the other boys in his group. Each session lasted 1hr 20 mins, with the last 20mins or so being spent on (educational) computer games. When I gave him the option of stopping at half term or carrying on right up to his 11+ he wanted to carry on.

Another advantage in having a tutor is that you have another person's views on your child's strengths and weaknesses. The centre we use holds mock 11+ tests about 4 months before the real thing which gives a good indication of how your child will cope in an exam setting and highlights areas to work on. I would still do some practice myself at home to make sure everything has been covered. I wouldn't leave everything to a tutor.

I do believe that it's important to keep the preparation in proportion. Unfortunately we have a system where the vast majority of children who pass have been coached either by a tutor or at home. So it isn't a level playing field and you have to do some form of preparation so your child isn't disadvantaged. But I think it's important not to cram a child to pass a test. There are horror stories on this forum about children doing whole practice papers the night before a test or back to back tests at home.

I think my forumula for my third son will be to have a go myself. If it turns into a battle then pack him off to the centre!

I don't think there's one right approach to preparing for selective tests, but if you have a co-operative child who is happy to work with you, then you could save yourself a lot of money!

Good luck!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 3:17 pm 
We used a tutor because my child has 3 siblings and with all the distractions at home it is a difficult environment to focus in, so going to a tutor once a week gave him that true focus, we also did some work at home which was quite relaxed with the knowledge that he would focus well at his lesson.

Also, the tutor sees so many potential grammar school candidates and obviously has a good idea whether your child is achieving the right marks on practise tests to pass the exam in your area. I know some of you might think that the tutor would just tutor and take the money, but I think you will find that most will say if they don't think your child has a chance.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:28 am
Posts: 1123
Location: Bexley
Bexley Mum 2, please please please can I talk to you privately. Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 9:31 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 8:49 am
Posts: 16
Location: Bexleyheath
I'm intrigued!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:28 am
Posts: 1123
Location: Bexley
No, it's nothing too suspicious, I just wanted some guidance really but I know we can't pass on details of tutors on this forum.

My daughter is a young year 4, one of the babies of the year. School says she is below average but when I give her a bond nvr book (age 9-10) she'll gladly tell me the answers.

Her school report does not match the child I have at home. She seems capable but not really interested in school. Also there is a lack of confidence at school. I'm having a bit of an battle with the school because the work that is set is not stretching my daughter and I think she is bored and switching off.

She knows all her tables up to 12x12 and gets her spellings right every week (middle group and she doesn't have to learn them) and she can tell you about all the different makes of cars!!! Anything visual with maths like charts and graphs and venn diagrams are very easy for her.

I started to measure her VR and that's very high too but the school says she is still below average with literacy and maths, 2a and 2b respectively. I have told the teacher that this is incorrect, and it doesn't represent the work she does for me, and I want her reassessed.

Now I know she is just 8 (august) but I have completely lost faith in the school system. As her Mum I know something isn't right and I have 2 years to sort it out.

My elder daughter is talented too and is at a grammar so I know what standards are expected. By the way, daughter 2 marks daughter 1's Latin and French homework!

Coming from Bexley, and if the system changes to 2 tests measuring just VR and NVR, I could potentailly have a child who passes 11+ who might not be that good yet at English and Maths. I have tried a bit of self help at home and we are getting there but she is so stubborn at times that we can end up arguing.

I feel so helpless with the situation. When my daughter is taken out of her class for extra help she is put in a small group with children who really do have learning difficulties or behavioural problems. She hates being put in this group. It's so sad and a waste of time. I'm sure I have an intelligent little girl here.

I just wanted advice from Bexey Mum 2 as to where to go for help. I don't want to be her teacher just her Mummy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 2:30 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2007 11:54 pm
Posts: 68
Location: wraysbury, middlesex
This must be second child syndrome! I have two girls, both bright but both so different! The eldest was always willing to tell me in minute detail what she had been doing at school, the youngest I get "fine" as an answer. Infuriating! Everyone presumes the eldest will sail through this years 11+ but I am keeping my fingers crossed. She has had to really work hard this year. I also know that the younger (year 4 summer born) is the wolf in sheeps clothing. She has her elder sister in tears with quick and correct answers to 11+ questions and yet won't sit down and do her own work. She looks at NVR and just says, "easy, that's A, that's D etc". Give her 10 monster spellings for a friday test and they are all correct and yet she often gets her b's and d's muddled. I totally sympathise with you! All you can do is put in the effort and try not to let them argue and fight, that way they win and get to watch TV instead of work. URRGHHH!


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