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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:58 am 
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Hi

Just for my own curiosity as well as an ongoing discussion with a friend. I just wonder if there are any articles/ reseach papers indicate that children from the independent primary schools are doing better in the 11+ exam than those come from the state sectors.

I always wonder why some parents move their children from year 3 from the state school to an independent school. ?? may be better chance to pass the 11+ exam.

Any experiences/ opinion are welcome. Thank you!!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:04 pm 
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Location: Bexley
I don't know of any research to back it up but it would make sense for children from independent schools to perform better than children from state schools. The former have access to better resources and are taught in smaller classes. Independent schools also presumably don't have the same hang ups/restrictions that state schools have about preparing for the 11+ exams and entrance exams.

I know of a few people who have sent their kids to independent primaries on the assumption that they will get a better education there which will help them pass the 11+.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 3:45 pm 
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What Bexley Mum said. It also happens a lot in Bucks! (Allegedly. :wink: )


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 4:21 pm 
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However, remember children at Private schools are likely to be brighter than average - so you can't really compare.

Teachers at private schools do not have to have a teaching qualification or belong to the General Teaching Council ( a regulatory body). I have seen some poor teaching that just would not be tolerated in a state school.

They do have more freedom to coach for the 11+ but in Bucks the Head has to sign a form that they have followed the guidelines so they should not.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 4:51 pm 
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Guest55 wrote:

They do have more freedom to coach for the 11+ but in Bucks the Head has to sign a form that they have followed the guidelines so they should not.


Hi Guest55,

Is this the case for so-called partner schools? (i.e. independent schools that administer the 11+)

I didn't realize the head had to sign a form. This would presumably mean that they follow the same process as state schools. However, I do know of at least one case where the parents are expecting some kind of help with 11+ preparation...perhaps it is therefore just the standard "familiarization" they were being told about ? :?

Regards

Marylou


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 4:56 pm 
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Yes i believe it applies to partner schools but it is also clear that some Heads may 'bend' the rules ...

There are always rumours about certain schools but I don't think many parents are going to tell Bucks CC if their child's school is breaking the rules.

http://www.buckscc.gov.uk/schools/leade ... anuals.asp


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 5:01 pm 
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Dear Marylou

Yes it does apply to partner schools, follows an extract from the headteachers manual. I have to say that I am aware that some independent schools, coach specifically for the Bucks 11 plus.

We would ask that you ensure that further repetition of the familiarisation and practice pack, or further practice or coaching with unregulated test materials is not undertaken in schools either during the school day or on other occasions. Sufficient resources are allocated to the selection procedure by the County Council and sufficient time is taken from staff time of the school curriculum during Year 5 and 6. Please do not recommend particular commercial coaching materials to parents. Following the testing you will be asked to confirm in writing that the school has not undertaken further familiarisation and practice. This will apply to all maintained and partner schools.


Patricia


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 5:33 pm 
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We sent our DD to a non selective private school (there are not any selective ones round here) because the words "able" or "intellegent" seem to be so unpopular in state schools! We were very fed up with quasi socialist teachers who hated us for wanting the best for DD who spent 90% ofher time bored stiff and the other 5% colouring! Our elder daughter seemed to be used for riot control at her state primary - put on the orange table with all the little fiends who would not stop talking et cetera!
The general standard of work at the private school is much higher and the children areleft in no doubt that their work is not good enough sometimes.
There are not any amazing resources but we happen to think that a red biro and a blackboard are all you need!
As far as the 11+ is concerned the school do VR lessons from year 3 onwards as part of the normal curriculum and most parents tutor as well. BUT - consider the following - in warwickshire there have been loads of accusations of cheating especially by the private schools so the education authority changed the exam and held it at designated test centres.
The result of this was that whereas DD's school used to get around 50% pass rate, this year it has been 75%! Perhaps it wasnot the PRIVATE schools who were doing the cheating!!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 5:47 pm 
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I suppose if verbal reasoning is part of the curriculum anyway, it would be easy to steer the practice towards the types of question used in the exam. After all, there is a subtle difference between overtly coaching for a test and practising a subject which is part of the school's normal curriculum. IYSWIM.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:21 pm 
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magwich wrote:
we happen to think that a red biro and a blackboard are all you need!


Magwich - good idea, but chalk works better! :lol:


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