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 Post subject: Standardised Score
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 8:48 am 
Would somebody be kind enough explain standardisation?

I have looked at the NFER page regarding standardising scores but find it difficult to work out.

In pratise tests my son always scores above 90% (94 probably being the score he gets most often). His birthday is in November so I don't think he will get any marks added on but how do I work out from this approximately what his standardised score would be?

Thank you in advance.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 9:50 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
Standardised scores depend on the average raw score for a particular paper.

For each paper, the average raw score is calculated, and then set to a predefined level by the NFER. for example , 110.
The maximum standardised score is also predefined (141 for example) and also the pass mark (121 for example)
For example, the average may be 70% for a paper, and 75% for another. In this case 110 would correspond to a 70% raw score for the first paper, and 75% for the second paper.
The same reasoning applies for the top score: it may be 90% for one paper and 95 %.

In addition, the papers are also standardised by age (months). The NFER calculates the average score for children who are 10, 10 and 1 month, 10 and 2 month etc. The average for the birth month is compared to the general average, and points are added/subtracted according to how well children in the birth month group have performed.
Generally, older children do better but it is not a rigid pattern. It may be that with a particular paper, the 10yrs 1 mth cohort performs better than the 10yrs 4mths cohort.
Children from the cohort that performed worse will have a higher standardised for the same raw score.

For example: the general average is 70% - the predefined standardised score is 110 - the average for the 10yrs 8mths group is 75% - the average for the 10yrs 1mth group is 67%. - the average for the 10yrs 4mth group is 70%

Children from 10yrs 4mths group scoring 70% will obtain a standardised score of 110
Children from 10yrs 8mths group scoring 70% will obtain a standardised score below 110 because their group performed better.
Children from 10yrs 1mth group scoring 70% will obtain a standardised score above 110 because their group performed worse.

Hope it makes sense. It is quite hard to explain …..


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 Post subject: spooky
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:13 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 1:20 pm
Posts: 75
Location: Lincolnshire
I had just decided to post asking the exact same question as this thread deals with.

Thank you Catherine, although I had understood the general idea of standardisation, this clarifies things for me a little.

My son was 10ys 2 months at the time of taking his tests. He sat 2 papers, 1 VR 1 NVR. The Vr having 100 questions and the NVR 65. He requires 220 to pass and I was unsure of how the results from the 2 seperate tests were used to create the final standardised score.

I assume from your post that the raw scores from each test will be standardised seperately and the added together!?! :?

Mabey I'm still a little unsure
angelz


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:30 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
My explanation refers to the standardisation for one paper. When there are several, it depends on the regions. For example Slough has three papers. Each is standardised and the final score is the average of the three standardised scores. So the pass mark is 111, max 141.
It seems that your final score is given as a total instead of an average. (which would be 110). The principal would be the same, just a differnt way of presenting the final result. I am just guessing though...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:28 pm 
Thank you Catherine for trying to explain this to me. I do understand it (sort of). However in our area their is fierce competition for the grammar school places and the pass mark is very high (I'm not sure how high exactly). I believe for a guaranteed place they have to have a standardised score of 280 from 2 vr papers of 100 questions, then I believe they work down unitil they have filled the places. I don't know what this equates to as a raw score though or generally what the lower end of the pass bracket goes to.

So many people have a different story to tell that one day I'm sure that my son is doing well enouqh and the next I'm sick with worry that he's just not going to get the mark! 280 seems very high when I look at your explanation of standardised scores!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
If you are in an area where the max score is 141, then yes, 280 is very high. It would mean that the pass score per paper would be only 1 mark below the max standardised score. However, the max standardised score is not necessarily 141. The NFER website states 'Standardised scores from most educational tests cover the same range from 70 to 140'. In Bucks they vary from 69 to 141.

It is also possible that if the school is very selective and only take the top 5% for example, the 280 to 282 scores make the top 5% of the cohort.
This is just a guess.

If you try to post in the Regions section and specify the schools you are intested in, you may get some info specific to your area, and the approximate raw score you need to be aiming for.

Regards


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 5:12 pm
Posts: 1301
Location: Birmingham
Hi Guest

I would be very surprised in the pass standardised score is 140 in each of 2 tests; that would be very close to the maximum score. It's sounds to me that the Authority or school is something to the equivalent of "if you score full marks in the tests we can guarantee you a place" which is a bit obvious.

The Standardisation scores vary from exam to exam but to give you an indication of some real Standardisation Scores from Real National Tests take a look at the recent 2006 key Stage 2 results. These are available at

http://www.qca.org.uk/16791.html

If you download and print this out and review you will see that a score of 140 for the Reading, Mental maths and Written Maths is equivalent to a raw score of about 48/50, 20/20, and 79/80 respectively. In fact for Mental Maths 20/20 only gives you a Standardised Score of 134 max as so many scored highly on this section.

The Standardised Score is Statistical distribution which means that the Standardised scores usually always equates to a percentile rank - ie the proportion of candidates achieving that score.

So for example, a score of 117 (a typical 11+ min pass score) is about the 87th percentile. ie 13% of candidates got this score above.

The figure of 140 you quoted is actually above the 99th percentile - ie less than 1% of candidates achieve that score.

For typical NFER exams we were always told that a raw score of about 86% 86/100 is equivalent to about the 117 Min Standardised pass - but please bear in mind that;
(1) this is min pass;
(2) there will be a lot a candidates about the pass level,
(3) The Age may impact this by say + or - 2 marks, and
(4) some LEAs might have a higher pass mark due to competition (say 121).

So to be reasonably confident a child needs to be hitting the 90% raw scores in typical NFER tests. But for harder tests this could be a lot lower - in some Birmingham tests for example, they don't use NFER and the pass marks are historically much lower 65% - 75%

Hope this helps and makes sense.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:44 pm 
Thank you Ken and Catherine. You've been of great help both of you I suspect that the 280 mark must be the max. score you speak of.

I understand the standardisation process much better now. I think that they do have to be in the top 5% to gain a place and I think that we might just be there. Here's hoping!

Just want to say that I've read avidly lots of the threads on this sight and it's been a great comfort leading up to the exam.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:49 pm 
Thank you Ken and Catherine. You've been of great help both of you I suspect that the 280 mark must be the max. score you speak of.

I understand the standardisation process much better now. I think that they do have to be in the top 5% to gain a place and I think that we might just be there. Here's hoping!

Just want to say that I've read avidly lots of the threads on this sight and it's been a great comfort leading up to the exam.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 1:20 pm
Posts: 75
Location: Lincolnshire
Thanks for that KenR

That would possibly make sense for the school my son wants to attend. I have read elswhere on this forum that Lincolnshire generally tend to take a slightly wider spectrum of abilities. If this is the case, a pass mark would be achievable by scoring 110 in each of the two tests, which would then be added together to give the pass mark of 220.

Of course, a pass doesnt automatically mean a place! but if this is the case, you roughly equated 117 standardised score to about 86% on NFER so 110 would be about 75-78%? This is the area that has been spoken about as being a rough pass mark (Hearsay I Know)

My son's practice test were in the region of 85-90%, so there is hope to hold on to yet.
angelz


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